Credentials As audiologists, we often engage in the obligatory practice of attempting to determine our rightful place as providers of hearing health care. In so doing, I am frequently reminded that the credentials of audiologists are not widely understood by the public. Perhaps it is time to evaluate those credentials ... Viewpoint
Viewpoint  |   March 01, 1994
Credentials
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lucille B. Beck, PhD
    Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 50 Irving St., NW, Room 1C118A, Washington, DC 20422
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Viewpoints
Viewpoint   |   March 01, 1994
Credentials
American Journal of Audiology, March 1994, Vol. 3, 5. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0301.05
 
American Journal of Audiology, March 1994, Vol. 3, 5. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0301.05
As audiologists, we often engage in the obligatory practice of attempting to determine our rightful place as providers of hearing health care. In so doing, I am frequently reminded that the credentials of audiologists are not widely understood by the public. Perhaps it is time to evaluate those credentials in the wider context of health care provision. The Food and Drug Administration apparently thinks so since it has posed two interesting questions in its advanced proposed rulemaking for hearing aid regulations. They are: Should states license health professionals before they are allowed to perform hearing assessments? And could the same objective be adequately achieved through accreditation by a professional organization?
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