Assistive Devices for Classroom Listening FM Systems Short Course
EDITOR'S AWARD
Short Course  |   March 01, 1994
Assistive Devices for Classroom Listening
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Dawna E. Lewis, MA
    Boys Town National Research Hospital, 555 N. 30th Street, Omaha, NE 68131
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / School-Based Settings / Short Courses
Short Course   |   March 01, 1994
Assistive Devices for Classroom Listening
American Journal of Audiology, March 1994, Vol. 3, 70-83. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0301.70
History: Received October 22, 1992 , Accepted October 28, 1993
 
American Journal of Audiology, March 1994, Vol. 3, 70-83. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0301.70
History: Received October 22, 1992; Accepted October 28, 1993

FM systems are the most common assistive listening devices used in classrooms by students with hearing loss. The benefits provided by these devices have resulted in an expansion of their use to extend beyond individuals with severe-to-profound hearing loss to individuals with minimal, conductive, and fluctuating hearing loss, as well as individuals with normal hearing who have additional learning problems. The first section of this article addresses current needs of audiologists working with FM systems as classroom listening devices. The remainder focuses on electroacoustic implications of various design features and coupling configurations used with FM systems.

Acknowledgments
I would like to thank Martha Auslander, Arlene Carney, Ann Karasek, Pat Stelmachowicz, and Don Worthington for helpful comments on earlier versions of this article. I would also like to thank Betsy From and Linda Mace for their assistance in preparation of the manuscript. This work was supported in part by NIH.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Audiology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access