Letter to the Editor I am writing this because of my deep concern about the use of “technicians” for audiology. Until the AuD becomes the accepted norm both legally and psychologically, we have no protection from nonaudiologists using these technicians for their own benefit and our detriment. Rhode Island audiologists have had great difficulty ... Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   March 01, 1994
Letter to the Editor
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Stephen D. Kasden
    Pawtucket, RI
Article Information
Professional Issues & Training / Letters to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   March 01, 1994
Letter to the Editor
American Journal of Audiology, March 1994, Vol. 3, 90. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0301.90a
 
American Journal of Audiology, March 1994, Vol. 3, 90. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0301.90a
I am writing this because of my deep concern about the use of “technicians” for audiology. Until the AuD becomes the accepted norm both legally and psychologically, we have no protection from nonaudiologists using these technicians for their own benefit and our detriment. Rhode Island audiologists have had great difficulty functioning because of technicians working under medical supervision. Our licensing law can do nothing to help us because MDs are exempt.
Unfortunately, ASHA led me to believe that this issue was resolved in 1964. Interestingly, in the year following this resolution I went to bed one night knowing that my legal interests were being looked after by my lawyer and awoke the next morning to find out that he was now a doctor of jurisprudence. Amazing as this may seem, I went through my own metamorphosis from a holder of a basic certificate in hearing to an audiologist with a certificate of clinical competence. This CCC (note: the abbreviation CCC has never been approved by ASHA) was to make all audiologists equal. Academic degrees were not to be used, as the CCC was to be the designator of approval and competence. The reason that this never happened can be found in the history of the academic portion of our profession. During the late 1950s and early 1960s, the U.S. government was infusing a great deal of money into the education of speech and hearing therapists (terminology at the time).
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