Letter to the Editor I was pleased to see Humes and Diefendorf publicly state that there are too many accredited audiology training programs in the U.S., but I disagree with their concept of the audiology technician. We have yet to establish audiology as an autonomous profession, and the availability of a marginally trained, inexpensive ... Letter to the Editor
Letter to the Editor  |   March 01, 1994
Letter to the Editor
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Reed Norwood
    Cookeville Hearing and Speech Center Cookeville, TN
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Practice Management / Professional Issues & Training / Letters to the Editor
Letter to the Editor   |   March 01, 1994
Letter to the Editor
American Journal of Audiology, March 1994, Vol. 3, 90. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0301.90b
 
American Journal of Audiology, March 1994, Vol. 3, 90. doi:10.1044/1059-0889.0301.90b
I was pleased to see Humes and Diefendorf publicly state that there are too many accredited audiology training programs in the U.S., but I disagree with their concept of the audiology technician. We have yet to establish audiology as an autonomous profession, and the availability of a marginally trained, inexpensive labor force at this time would seriously undermine any attempts to do so. The audiology technician concept has the appearance of market development for existing academic programs at the expense of the rest of the profession and clients with impaired hearing. It is obvious that many in the academic community are grossly out of touch with the audiologist’s existence in the nonacademic setting; it is time for them to become concerned about and involved in reimbursement issues, scope of practice, and other issues concerning professional “turf” at the national and state legislative levels. When these issues are resolved in a way that allows the audiologist’s participation in the health-care arena to be recognized and rewarded on a par with providers in optometry, dentistry, and physical therapy, then we can be concerned with training assistants (who would probably work for about the same wages many audiologists now earn).
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