Research Article  |   December 2011
Impact of Co-Occurring Birth Defects on the Timing of Newborn Hearing Screening and Diagnosis
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Derek A. Chapman
    Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond
    Virginia Department of Health, Richmond
  • Caroline C. Stampfel
    Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond
    Virginia Department of Health, Richmond
  • Joann N. Bodurtha
    Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond
  • Kelley M. Dodson
    Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond
  • Arti Pandya
    Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond
  • Kathleen B. Lynch
    Virginia Commonwealth University, Richmond
  • Russell S. Kirby
    University of South Florida, Tampa
  • Correspondence to Derek A. Chapman: dachapman@vcu.edu
  • Caroline C. Stampfel is now at the Association of Maternal & Child Health Programs.
    Caroline C. Stampfel is now at the Association of Maternal & Child Health Programs.×
  • Editor: Sheila Pratt
    Editor: Sheila Pratt×
  • Associate Editor: Karen Muñoz
    Associate Editor: Karen Muñoz×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Genetic & Congenital Disorders / Early Identification & Intervention / Research Article
Research Article   |   December 2011
Impact of Co-Occurring Birth Defects on the Timing of Newborn Hearing Screening and Diagnosis
American Journal of Audiology, December 2011, Vol. 20, 132-139. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2011/10-0049)
History: Received December 3, 2010 , Revised April 18, 2011 , Accepted May 27, 2011
 
American Journal of Audiology, December 2011, Vol. 20, 132-139. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2011/10-0049)
History: Received December 3, 2010; Revised April 18, 2011; Accepted May 27, 2011
Web of Science® Times Cited: 3

Purpose: Early detection of hearing loss in all newborns and timely intervention are critical to children’s cognitive, verbal, behavioral, and social development. The initiation of appropriate early intervention services before 6 months of age can prevent or reduce negative developmental consequences. The purpose of this study was to assess, using large, population-based registries, the effect of co-occurring birth defects (CBDs) on the timing and overall rate of hearing screening and diagnosis.

Method: The authors linked statewide data from newborn hearing screenings, a birth defects registry, and birth certificates to assess the timeliness of newborn hearing screening and diagnosis of hearing loss (HL) for infants with and without CBDs in 485 children with confirmed HL.

Results: Nearly one third (31.5%) of children with HL had 1 or more CBDs. The presence of CBDs prolonged the time of the initial infant hearing screening, which contributed to further delays in the subsequent diagnosis of HL.

Conclusions: Better coordination of HL assessment into treatment plans for children with CBDs may enable earlier diagnosis of HL and provide opportunities for intervention that will affect long-term developmental outcomes for these children.

Acknowledgments
This research was supported in part by grants from the Association of University Centers on Disability Cooperative Agreement with the National Center on Birth Defects and Developmental Disabilities, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (RTOI 2007-01-10), and the Health Resources and Services Administration (H18MC00052-14-01). We acknowledge the work of Andrea Alvarez, who assisted with the identification of cases of hearing loss and extracting data from the newborn hearing screening data system. We thank the Pediatrics Screening and Genetics Services staff at the Virginia Department of Health, who collect and maintain the birth defects and newborn hearing screening registry data used in the research reported in this article.
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