Cortical High-Gamma Responses in Auditory Processing PurposeThis tutorial provides an introduction to cortical auditory spectral responses, focusing on event-related activity in the high-gamma frequencies (60–150 Hz), their recent emergence in neuroscience research, and potential clinical applications.MethodAuditory high-gamma responses are described and compared with traditional cortical evoked responses, including the auditory evoked N1 response. Methods for acquiring ... Tutorial
Tutorial  |   December 2011
Cortical High-Gamma Responses in Auditory Processing
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mackenzie C. Cervenka
    Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
  • Stephanie Nagle
    Towson University, Towson, MD
  • Dana Boatman-Reich
    Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
  • Correspondence to Dana Boatman-Reich: dboatma@jhmi.edu
  • Editor: Robert Schlauch (Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research)
    Editor: Robert Schlauch (Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research)×
  • Associate Editor: Carolyn Brown
    Associate Editor: Carolyn Brown×
  • © 2011 American Speech-Language-Hearing Association
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Tutorial
Tutorial   |   December 2011
Cortical High-Gamma Responses in Auditory Processing
American Journal of Audiology, December 2011, Vol. 20, 171-180. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2011/10-0036)
History: Received September 3, 2010 , Revised June 16, 2011 , Accepted August 29, 2011
 
American Journal of Audiology, December 2011, Vol. 20, 171-180. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2011/10-0036)
History: Received September 3, 2010; Revised June 16, 2011; Accepted August 29, 2011
Web of Science® Times Cited: 5
Acknowledgments
This work was supported by National Institutes of Health Grants RO1-DC05645 and K24-DC010028. Special thanks to Piotr Franaszczuk for assistance with the description of signal processing methods and to Sarah Colwell and Paras Bhatt for assistance with the figures.

PurposeThis tutorial provides an introduction to cortical auditory spectral responses, focusing on event-related activity in the high-gamma frequencies (60–150 Hz), their recent emergence in neuroscience research, and potential clinical applications.

MethodAuditory high-gamma responses are described and compared with traditional cortical evoked responses, including the auditory evoked N1 response. Methods for acquiring and analyzing spectral responses, including time-frequency analyses, are discussed and contrasted with more familiar time-domain averaging approaches. Four cases are presented illustrating high-gamma response patterns associated with normal and impaired auditory processing.

ConclusionsCortical auditory high-gamma responses may provide a useful clinical measure of auditory processing.

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