Clinical Focus  |   December 2011
Survey of Audiologic Service Provision to Older Adults With Cochlear Implants
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jessica Rossi-Katz
    Metropolitan State College of Denver, Denver, CO
  • Kathryn Hoberg Arehart
    University of Colorado at Boulder
  • Correspondence to Jessica Rossi-Katz: jrossika@mscd.edu
  • Editor: Sheila Pratt
    Editor: Sheila Pratt×
  • Associate Editor: Lisa Potts
    Associate Editor: Lisa Potts×
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   December 2011
Survey of Audiologic Service Provision to Older Adults With Cochlear Implants
American Journal of Audiology December 2011, Vol.20, 84-89. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2011/10-0044)
History: Accepted 15 Aug 2011 , Received 24 Oct 2010 , Revised 01 Apr 2011
American Journal of Audiology December 2011, Vol.20, 84-89. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2011/10-0044)
History: Accepted 15 Aug 2011 , Received 24 Oct 2010 , Revised 01 Apr 2011

Purpose: This study examined whether audiologists modify practice patterns in their provision of cochlear implant (CI) services to older adults and, if so, whether the nature of such modifications is consistent across clinical sites.

Method: An online survey was sent to audiologists at CI centers across the United States. Questions addressed demographics, candidacy, programming, outcomes assessment, rehabilitation, and professional development.

Results: Responses were obtained from 47 audiologists who provided CI services to older adults. The majority of these audiologists did not report modifying CI practice patterns on the basis of age. Counseling appeared to be an exception: Audiologists reported that both the content and delivery of information were modified for older adults. Specific to CI candidacy with older adults, under half of the respondents indicated that assessing an older adult’s cognitive status was part of their clinical protocol.

Conclusion: The audiologists who responded to the survey acknowledged issues related to aging when providing CI services to older adults. Despite this acknowledgment, the results of the survey suggest a gap in how age-related issues are incorporated into CI service provision. Continued discussion as to how CI services can be optimized for older adults is needed.

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