Is Measured Hearing Aid Benefit Affected by Seeing Baseline Outcome Questionnaire Responses? Purpose To determine whether hearing aid outcome measured by the Hearing Handicap Inventory (HHI) for the Elderly/Adults (Newman, Weinstein, Jacobson, & Hug, 1990; Ventry & Weinstein, 1982) is differentially affected by informed vs. blind administration of the postfitting questionnaire. Method Participants completed the HHI at their hearing aid ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 2011
Is Measured Hearing Aid Benefit Affected by Seeing Baseline Outcome Questionnaire Responses?
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • ShienPei Silverman
    National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research, Portland VA Medical Center, Portland, OR
  • Megan Cates
    University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences/University of Arkansas at Little Rock
  • Gabrielle Saunders
    National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research, Portland VA Medical Center, Portland, OR
  • Correspondence to Gabrielle Saunders: gabrielle.saunders@va.gov
  • Editor: Sheila Pratt
    Editor: Sheila Pratt×
  • Associate Editor: Jean-Pierre Gagne
    Associate Editor: Jean-Pierre Gagne×
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 2011
Is Measured Hearing Aid Benefit Affected by Seeing Baseline Outcome Questionnaire Responses?
American Journal of Audiology, December 2011, Vol. 20, 90-99. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2011/10-0003)
History: Received January 22, 2010 , Revised June 16, 2010 , Accepted April 25, 2011
 
American Journal of Audiology, December 2011, Vol. 20, 90-99. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2011/10-0003)
History: Received January 22, 2010; Revised June 16, 2010; Accepted April 25, 2011

Purpose To determine whether hearing aid outcome measured by the Hearing Handicap Inventory (HHI) for the Elderly/Adults (Newman, Weinstein, Jacobson, & Hug, 1990; Ventry & Weinstein, 1982) is differentially affected by informed vs. blind administration of the postfitting questionnaire.

Method Participants completed the HHI at their hearing aid evaluation and again at their hearing aid follow-up visit. At follow-up, half received a clean HHI form (blind administration), whereas the remainder responded on their original form (informed administration) and could thus base their follow-up responses on those they gave at the hearing aid evaluation.

Results The data show that for the population examined here, informed administration of the follow-up HHI did not yield a different outcome to blind administration of the follow-up HHI. This was not influenced by past hearing aid use, age of the participant, or the duration of time between baseline questionnaire completion and follow-up completion.

Conclusion These data suggest that completion of follow-up questionnaires in either informed or blind format will have little impact on HHI responses, most likely because of the many other factors that combined to influence hearing aid outcome.

Acknowledgments
Support was provided by National Institutes of Health Pre-doctoral Training Grant T35 DC008764 and by VA Rehabilitation Research & Development Grant C4844C awarded to the VA RR&D National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research. We thank Portland VAMC Audiology clinic staff for their participation and assistance with data collection.
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