Addressing Qualified Personnel Shortages for Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing With an Interdisciplinary Service Learning Program Purpose To describe the student training benefits for speech-language pathology graduate students involved in an interdisciplinary, community-based intervention program at a Midwestern university for families of preschool children who were deaf or hard of hearing (DHH) and auditory-based spoken language users. Method The Auditory and Language Enriched Program ... Supplement Article
Supplement Article  |   December 01, 2011
Addressing Qualified Personnel Shortages for Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing With an Interdisciplinary Service Learning Program
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lori A. Pakulski
    The University of Toledo, Toledo, OH
  • Correspondence to Lori A. Pakulski: lori.pakulski@utoledo.edu
  • Editor and Associate Editor: Sheila Pratt
    Editor and Associate Editor: Sheila Pratt×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Professional Issues & Training / Supplement: Using Service Learning to Enhance Undergraduate and Graduate Education in Audiology and Aural Rehabilitation
Supplement Article   |   December 01, 2011
Addressing Qualified Personnel Shortages for Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing With an Interdisciplinary Service Learning Program
American Journal of Audiology, December 2011, Vol. 20, S203-S219. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2011/11-0005)
History: Received January 10, 2011 , Revised June 21, 2011 , Accepted October 11, 2011
 
American Journal of Audiology, December 2011, Vol. 20, S203-S219. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2011/11-0005)
History: Received January 10, 2011; Revised June 21, 2011; Accepted October 11, 2011
Web of Science® Times Cited: 7

Purpose To describe the student training benefits for speech-language pathology graduate students involved in an interdisciplinary, community-based intervention program at a Midwestern university for families of preschool children who were deaf or hard of hearing (DHH) and auditory-based spoken language users.

Method The Auditory and Language Enriched Program was developed to provide graduate students with a clinically relevant service learning opportunity that also met some unique community needs of families in the community. Specifically, students learned to provide families with imaginative ways to expose their children who were DHH to language and literacy and nurture their natural curiosity and zest for learning.

Results Statistically significant improvement was noted between pre- and postintervention questionnaires of knowledge and skill related to intervention for this population by a single group of students.

Conclusions An interdisciplinary service learning approach to intervention might provide opportunities for university graduate programs to address the immediate and long-term needs of families who have chosen a spoken language outcome for their young children who are DHH while simultaneously providing invaluable experience with low-incidence populations for their preservice graduate students.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Audiology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access