The Awareness of Doctoral-Level Professions Among Entering College Students Purpose The purpose of this study was to survey entering college students' awareness of the profession of audiology, as well as to compare the students' awareness of audiology to their awareness of roles in 2 other doctoral-level professions. Method A survey examining students' awareness and perception of the ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 2013
The Awareness of Doctoral-Level Professions Among Entering College Students
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jeremy J. Donai
    Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock
  • Candace B. Hicks
    Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock
  • Mallory McCart
    Texas Tech University Health Sciences Center, Lubbock
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Jeremy J. Donai, who is now at West Virginia University, Morgantown: jeremy.donai@mail.wvu.edu
  • Editor: Larry Humes
    Editor: Larry Humes×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Professional Issues & Training / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 2013
The Awareness of Doctoral-Level Professions Among Entering College Students
American Journal of Audiology, December 2013, Vol. 22, 271-282. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2013/13-0012)
History: Received February 11, 2013 , Revised March 29, 2013 , Accepted April 3, 2013
 
American Journal of Audiology, December 2013, Vol. 22, 271-282. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2013/13-0012)
History: Received February 11, 2013; Revised March 29, 2013; Accepted April 3, 2013

Purpose The purpose of this study was to survey entering college students' awareness of the profession of audiology, as well as to compare the students' awareness of audiology to their awareness of roles in 2 other doctoral-level professions.

Method A survey examining students' awareness and perception of the profession of audiology was administered in 2009 at the California University of Pennsylvania (Emanuel, Donai, & Araj, 2012). A modified survey, which included questions about awareness of the profession of audiology as well as podiatry and optometry, was distributed in 2012.

Results Survey data suggest that, overall, students were more accurate in describing the profession of optometry compared to audiology, but no difference existed between their awareness of podiatry and audiology. However, students with self-reported awareness of the three professions were more accurate in describing the professions of podiatry and optometry as compared to audiology.

Conclusions Results of this distribution suggest an upward trend in audiology awareness among students. However, the awareness of audiology as a potential career path is low relative to that of the professions of optometry and podiatry for those with self-reported knowledge. Future surveys should be distributed to entering college students at other universities, varying in size, location, and demographics.

Acknowledgments
We thank California University of Pennsylvania Provost Geraldine Jones for approving the most recent distribution of the survey and Jennifer Sigado for distributing the survey on numerous occasions. Without their invaluable assistance, this project would not have been possible. In addition, a special thanks to Leann Clements for her assistance with the project.
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