Evidence-Based Practice in Audiology: Rehabilitation Options for Adults With Hearing Impairment Purpose The authors address 3 questions: (a) What is evidence-based practice (EBP), and why is it important for adults with hearing impairment? (b) What is the evidence about intervention options for adults who fail a hearing screening and are identified with hearing impairment? (c) What intervention options do adults choose ... Research Forum
Research Forum  |   December 01, 2013
Evidence-Based Practice in Audiology: Rehabilitation Options for Adults With Hearing Impairment
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Louise Hickson
    Communication Disability Centre, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
    HEARing Cooperative Research Centre, Melbourne, Victoria, Australia
  • Ariane Laplante-Lévesque
    Communication Disability Centre, University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark
  • Lena Wong
    University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Louise Hickson: l.hickson@uq.edu.au
  • Editor: Larry Humes
    Editor: Larry Humes×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / Research Forum
Research Forum   |   December 01, 2013
Evidence-Based Practice in Audiology: Rehabilitation Options for Adults With Hearing Impairment
American Journal of Audiology, December 2013, Vol. 22, 329-331. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2013/12-0085)
History: Received December 31, 2012 , Revised February 20, 2013 , Accepted March 5, 2013
 
American Journal of Audiology, December 2013, Vol. 22, 329-331. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2013/12-0085)
History: Received December 31, 2012; Revised February 20, 2013; Accepted March 5, 2013
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose The authors address 3 questions: (a) What is evidence-based practice (EBP), and why is it important for adults with hearing impairment? (b) What is the evidence about intervention options for adults who fail a hearing screening and are identified with hearing impairment? (c) What intervention options do adults choose when identified with hearing impairment for the first time?

Method The 5 steps of the EBP process are discussed in relation to a clinical question about whether hearing aids and communication programs reduce activity limitations and participation restrictions compared with no treatment for adults who fail a hearing screening and are identified with hearing impairment.

Results Systematic reviews of the evidence indicate that both hearing aids and communication programs reduce activity limitations and participation restrictions for this population and are therefore appropriate options. A study is then described in which these options were presented to 153 clients identified with hearing impairment for the first time: 43% chose hearing aids, 18% chose communication programs, and the remaining 39% chose not to take any action.

Conclusion EBP supports the offer of intervention options to adults who fail a hearing screening and are identified with hearing impairment.

Acknowledgments
The second author acknowledges the financial support of the Australian Department of Education, Science, and Training.
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