Learning to Listen Again: The Role of Compliance in Auditory Training for Adults With Hearing Loss Purpose To examine the role of compliance in the outcomes of computer-based auditory training with the Listening and Communication Enhancement (LACE) program in Veterans using hearing aids. Method The authors examined available LACE training data for 5 tasks (i.e., speech-in-babble, time compression, competing speaker, auditory memory, missing word) ... Research Forum
Research Forum  |   December 01, 2013
Learning to Listen Again: The Role of Compliance in Auditory Training for Adults With Hearing Loss
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Theresa Hnath Chisolm
    University of South Florida, Tampa
    Bay Pines Veterans Affairs Healthcare Center, Bay Pines, Florida
  • Gabrielle H. Saunders
    Veterans Affairs National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research, Portland, Oregon
  • Melissa T. Frederick
    Veterans Affairs National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research, Portland, Oregon
  • Rachel A. McArdle
    University of South Florida, Tampa
    Bay Pines Veterans Affairs Healthcare Center, Bay Pines, Florida
  • Sherri L. Smith
    James H. Quillen Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Mountain Home, Tennessee
    East Tennessee State University, Johnson City
  • Richard H. Wilson
    James H. Quillen Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Mountain Home, Tennessee
    East Tennessee State University, Johnson City
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Theresa H. Chisolm: chisolm@usf.edu
  • Editor: Larry Humes
    Editor: Larry Humes×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research Forum
Research Forum   |   December 01, 2013
Learning to Listen Again: The Role of Compliance in Auditory Training for Adults With Hearing Loss
American Journal of Audiology, December 2013, Vol. 22, 339-342. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2013/12-0081)
History: Received December 19, 2012 , Revised April 24, 2013 , Accepted May 6, 2013
 
American Journal of Audiology, December 2013, Vol. 22, 339-342. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2013/12-0081)
History: Received December 19, 2012; Revised April 24, 2013; Accepted May 6, 2013
Web of Science® Times Cited: 7

Purpose To examine the role of compliance in the outcomes of computer-based auditory training with the Listening and Communication Enhancement (LACE) program in Veterans using hearing aids.

Method The authors examined available LACE training data for 5 tasks (i.e., speech-in-babble, time compression, competing speaker, auditory memory, missing word) from 50 hearing-aid users who participated in a larger, randomized controlled trial designed to examine the efficacy of LACE training. The goals were to determine: (a) whether there were changes in performance over 20 training sessions on trained tasks (i.e., on-task outcomes); and (b) whether compliance, defined as completing all 20 sessions, vs. noncompliance, defined as completing less than 20 sessions, influenced performance on parallel untrained tasks (i.e., off-task outcomes).

Results The majority, 84% of participants, completed 20 sessions, with maximum outcome occurring with at least 10 sessions of training for some tasks and up to 20 sessions of training for others. Comparison of baseline to posttest performance revealed statistically significant improvements for 4 of 7 off-task outcome measures for the compliant group, with at least small (0.2 < d < 0.3) Cohen's d effect sizes for 3 of the 4. There were no statistically significant improvements observed for the noncompliant group.

Conclusion The high level of compliance in the present study may be attributable to use of systematized verbal and written instructions with telephone follow-up. Compliance, as expected, appears important for optimizing the outcomes of auditory training. Methods to improve compliance in clinical populations need to be developed, and compliance data are important to report in future studies of auditory training.

Acknowledgments
The Rehabilitation Research and Development Service, Department of Veterans Affairs, supported this work through a Merit Review (C6303R); a Research Career Development award, given to the fourth and fifth authors (fourth author, C6394W; fifth author, C3800W); the Auditory and Vestibular Dysfunction Research Enhancement Award Program (REAP; C4339F); and a Senior Research Career Scientist award, given to the sixth author (C2400S). Appreciation is expressed to Cassie Boyle, Melissa Anderson, and Shienpei Silverman for their contributions. The contents of this article do not represent the views of the Department of Veterans Affairs or the United States Government.
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