Subjective Fatigue in Children With Hearing Loss: Some Preliminary Findings Purpose In this study, the authors examined the effect of hearing loss on subjective reports of fatigue in school-age children using a standardized measure. Methods As part of a larger ongoing study, the authors obtained subjective ratings of fatigue using the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL) Multidimensional ... Research Note
Research Note  |   March 01, 2014
Subjective Fatigue in Children With Hearing Loss: Some Preliminary Findings
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Benjamin W. Y. Hornsby
    Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN
  • Krystal Werfel
    Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN
  • Stephen Camarata
    Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN
  • Fred H. Bess
    Vanderbilt University School of Medicine, Nashville, TN
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Krystal Werfel is now with the University of South Carolina, Columbia.
    Krystal Werfel is now with the University of South Carolina, Columbia.×
  • Correspondence to Benjamin W. Y. Hornsby: ben.hornsby@vanderbilt.edu
  • Editor: Larry Humes
    Editor: Larry Humes×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / School-Based Settings / Research Note
Research Note   |   March 01, 2014
Subjective Fatigue in Children With Hearing Loss: Some Preliminary Findings
American Journal of Audiology, March 2014, Vol. 23, 129-134. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2013/13-0017)
History: Received March 25, 2013 , Revised May 8, 2013 , Accepted May 24, 2013
 
American Journal of Audiology, March 2014, Vol. 23, 129-134. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2013/13-0017)
History: Received March 25, 2013; Revised May 8, 2013; Accepted May 24, 2013
Web of Science® Times Cited: 7

Purpose In this study, the authors examined the effect of hearing loss on subjective reports of fatigue in school-age children using a standardized measure.

Methods As part of a larger ongoing study, the authors obtained subjective ratings of fatigue using the Pediatric Quality of Life Inventory (PedsQL) Multidimensional Fatigue Scale (Varni, Burwinkle, Katz, Meeske, & Dickinson, 2002). This standardized scale provides a measure of general fatigue, sleep/rest fatigue, cognitive fatigue, and an overall composite measure of fatigue. To date, data from 10 children with hearing loss (CHL) and 10 age-matched children with normal hearing (CNH) have been analyzed.

Results These preliminary results show that subjective fatigue is increased in school-age children with hearing loss (Cohen's d = 0.78–1.90). In addition, the impact of hearing loss on fatigue in school-age children appears pervasive across multiple domains (general, sleep/rest, and cognitive fatigue).

Conclusion School-age CHL reported significantly more fatigue than did CNH. These preliminary data are important given the negative academic and psychosocial consequences associated with fatigue. Further research is needed to determine the underlying mechanisms responsible for this increased fatigue in school-age children with hearing loss, and to identify factors that may modulate (e.g., degree of loss) and mediate (e.g., hearing aid or cochlear implant use) its impact.

Acknowledgments
The research reported here was supported by Institute of Education Sciences, U.S. Department of Education Grant R324A110266 (F. Bess, PI), awarded to Vanderbilt University. The opinions expressed are those of the authors and do not represent views of the Institute of Education Sciences or the U.S. Department of Education. We thank the graduate students from the Department of Hearing and Speech Sciences, Vanderbilt Bill Wilkerson Center, who assisted in subject recruitment and data collection for the project, including Lindsey Rentmeester, Samantha Gustafson, Andy DeLong, and Amelia Shuster.
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