Survey of Spanish Parents of Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing: Decision-Making Factors Associated With Communication Modality and Bilingualism PurposeThe purpose of the present study was (a) to describe factors and trends associated with Spanish parents' choice of communication modality and spoken-language bilingualism for children who are deaf or hard of hearing (DHH) and (b) to identify if bilingual variables predict children's bilingual status in a country where bilingualism ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 2013
Survey of Spanish Parents of Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing: Decision-Making Factors Associated With Communication Modality and Bilingualism
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mark Guiberson
    University of Wyoming, Laramie
  • Correspondence to Mark Guiberson: mguibers@uwyo.edu
  • Editor: Larry Humes
    Editor: Larry Humes×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Research Article
Research Article   |   June 01, 2013
Survey of Spanish Parents of Children Who Are Deaf or Hard of Hearing: Decision-Making Factors Associated With Communication Modality and Bilingualism
American Journal of Audiology, June 2013, Vol. 22, 105-119. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2012/12-0042)
History: Received July 20, 2012 , Revised October 17, 2012 , Accepted October 31, 2012
 
American Journal of Audiology, June 2013, Vol. 22, 105-119. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2012/12-0042)
History: Received July 20, 2012; Revised October 17, 2012; Accepted October 31, 2012
Web of Science® Times Cited: 4

PurposeThe purpose of the present study was (a) to describe factors and trends associated with Spanish parents' choice of communication modality and spoken-language bilingualism for children who are deaf or hard of hearing (DHH) and (b) to identify if bilingual variables predict children's bilingual status in a country where bilingualism is common.

MethodSeventy-one Spanish parents of children who are DHH completed an online survey that included questions about demographics, family and professional involvement and support, accessibility to information and services, and bilingual background and beliefs. Analyses were completed to describe groups and to examine how variables were associated with parents' decisions.

ResultsThirty-eight percent of parents chose to raise their children to be spoken-language bilingual. Most parents indicated that they believed being bilingual was beneficial for their children and that children who are DHH are capable of becoming bilingual in spoken languages. Parent's bilingual score, beliefs about raising children who are DHH bilingually, and encouragement to do so, were significantly associated with children's bilingual status.

ConclusionIn communities where bilingualism is common, bilingual parents will often choose to raise children who are DHH bilingual in spoken languages. Implications for practice and future studies in the United States are provided.

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