Masking Release Due to Linguistic and Phonetic Dissimilarity Between the Target and Masker Speech PurposeTo investigate masking release for speech maskers for linguistically and phonetically close (English and Dutch) and distant (English and Mandarin) language pairs.MethodThirty-two monolingual speakers of English with normal audiometric thresholds participated in the study. Data are reported for an English sentence recognition task in English and for Dutch and Mandarin ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 2013
Masking Release Due to Linguistic and Phonetic Dissimilarity Between the Target and Masker Speech
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lauren Calandruccio
    Queens College of the City University of New York, Flushing
  • Susanne Brouwer
    Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
  • Kristin J. Van Engen
    Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
  • Sumitrajit Dhar
    Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
  • Ann R. Bradlow
    Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
  • Kirstin J. Van Engen is now at Washington University, St. Louis, MO
    Kirstin J. Van Engen is now at Washington University, St. Louis, MO×
  • Correspondence to Lauren Calandruccio: who is now at The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, lauren_calandruccio@med.unc.edu
  • Editor: Larry Humes
    Editor: Larry Humes×
Article Information
Cultural & Linguistic Diversity / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Article
Research Article   |   June 01, 2013
Masking Release Due to Linguistic and Phonetic Dissimilarity Between the Target and Masker Speech
American Journal of Audiology, June 2013, Vol. 22, 157-164. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2013/12-0072)
History: Received November 26, 2012 , Accepted January 31, 2013
 
American Journal of Audiology, June 2013, Vol. 22, 157-164. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2013/12-0072)
History: Received November 26, 2012; Accepted January 31, 2013
Web of Science® Times Cited: 12

PurposeTo investigate masking release for speech maskers for linguistically and phonetically close (English and Dutch) and distant (English and Mandarin) language pairs.

MethodThirty-two monolingual speakers of English with normal audiometric thresholds participated in the study. Data are reported for an English sentence recognition task in English and for Dutch and Mandarin competing speech maskers (Experiment 1) and noise maskers (Experiment 2) that were matched either to the long-term average speech spectra or to the temporal modulations of the speech maskers from Experiment 1.

ResultsListener performance increased as the target-to-masker linguistic distance increased (English-in-English < English-in-Dutch < English-in-Mandarin).

ConclusionSpectral differences between maskers can account for some, but not all, of the variation in performance between maskers; however, temporal differences did not seem to play a significant role.

Acknowledgments
A portion of these data were presented at the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association 2009 annual convention in New Orleans, LA. Thank you to Chun Chan for his assistance throughout this research project.
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