Tool Kit for Screening Otologic Function of Older Adults1 PurposeTo propose a hearing health care tool kit, for use in primary care, that includes a new, comprehensive, and easy-to-administer self-report tool, namely, the Screening for Otologic Functional Impairments (SOFI). The target population for the proposed tool kit includes older adults with multimorbidity who are (a) at risk for hearing-related ... Research Forum
Research Forum  |   June 01, 2013
Tool Kit for Screening Otologic Function of Older Adults1
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Barbara E. Weinstein
    The Graduate Center, CUNY, New York, NY
  • Correspondence to Barbara E. Weinstein: bweinstein@gc.cuny.edu
  • Editor: Larry Humes
    Editor: Larry Humes×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Research Forum
Research Forum   |   June 01, 2013
Tool Kit for Screening Otologic Function of Older Adults1
American Journal of Audiology, June 2013, Vol. 22, 179-182. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2013/12-0057)
History: Received October 25, 2012 , Accepted February 22, 2013
 
American Journal of Audiology, June 2013, Vol. 22, 179-182. doi:10.1044/1059-0889(2013/12-0057)
History: Received October 25, 2012; Accepted February 22, 2013

PurposeTo propose a hearing health care tool kit, for use in primary care, that includes a new, comprehensive, and easy-to-administer self-report tool, namely, the Screening for Otologic Functional Impairments (SOFI). The target population for the proposed tool kit includes older adults with multimorbidity who are (a) at risk for hearing-related functional deficits and/or (b) likely to benefit from targeted audiologic interventions designed to optimize function, support independence, maximize safety, and cultivate self-sufficiency and social connectedness (American Academy of Nursing's Expert Panel on Acute and Critical Care, 2012).

MethodTwenty-nine older adults with varying levels of hearing impairment drawn from 2 ear, nose, and throat clinics and 1 university clinic underwent hearing testing and completed a series of self-report tools designed to assess otologic function and depression. All of the participants completed the SOFI on 2 occasions.

ResultsThe SOFI has high reliability and validity and the potential for identifying older adults requiring audiologic intervention.

ConclusionThe proposed tool kit, for use in primary care, includes several components that are integral to help-seeking behavior. The goal is to identify older adults with multimorbidity who are at risk for otologic conditions, that, once identified and treated, may help promote older adults' quality of care and life.

Acknowledgments
This project was supported in part by a PSC-CUNY award. I would like to thank Craig Newman and Sharon Sandridge, who collaborated on the development of the SOFI; Craig Newman, Sharon Sandridge, Joseph Montano, and Michael Bergen, who assisted with the data collection; and Carol Silverman, who assisted with data analysis.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Audiology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access