No Learning Effect Observed for Reception Thresholds for Sentences in Noise Purpose This study examined reception thresholds for sentences (RTSs) as a function of test session (N = 5) and noise (continuous and interrupted) in normal-hearing adults. It was hypothesized that RTSs would be superior in interrupted noise and would be stable across repeated testing. Method Twenty-five normal-hearing adults ... Research Note
Research Note  |   June 01, 2014
No Learning Effect Observed for Reception Thresholds for Sentences in Noise
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Andrew Stuart
    East Carolina University, Greenville, NC
  • Alyson K. Butler
    East Carolina University, Greenville, NC
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Andrew Stuart: stuarta@ecu.edu
  • Editor: Larry Humes
    Editor: Larry Humes×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Research Notes
Research Note   |   June 01, 2014
No Learning Effect Observed for Reception Thresholds for Sentences in Noise
American Journal of Audiology, June 2014, Vol. 23, 227-231. doi:10.1044/2014_AJA-14-0005
History: Received January 24, 2014 , Revised March 6, 2014 , Accepted March 24, 2014
 
American Journal of Audiology, June 2014, Vol. 23, 227-231. doi:10.1044/2014_AJA-14-0005
History: Received January 24, 2014; Revised March 6, 2014; Accepted March 24, 2014

Purpose This study examined reception thresholds for sentences (RTSs) as a function of test session (N = 5) and noise (continuous and interrupted) in normal-hearing adults. It was hypothesized that RTSs would be superior in interrupted noise and would be stable across repeated testing.

Method Twenty-five normal-hearing adults participated. RTSs were determined with Hearing in Noise Test sentences in continuous and interrupted noise presented at 65 dBA. An adaptive technique was used where sentences varied in intensity to converge on a level of 50% of correct performance. Sentence lists were counterbalanced with 5 unique lists in both continuous and interrupted noise.

Results RTS signal-to-noise ratios were significantly better in the interrupted noise (p < .0001). There was no effect of test session (p = .12) or a Test Session × Noise interaction (p = .13).

Conclusions Stable RTS signal-to-noise ratios across test sessions in both noises are consistent with the notion that a learning effect was not present in noise. Further, one may conclude that Hearing in Noise Test sentences provide stable measures of sentence recognition thresholds in normal-hearing adults over time so long as sentences are unique or are not repeated.

Acknowledgment
This work was presented in part on November 14, 2013, at the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association Annual Convention, Chicago, IL.
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