Use of the Implicit Association Test for the Measurement of Tinnitus-Related Distress Purpose A priming stimulus activates and increases an association with the target stimulus. The goal of this research was to investigate whether current tinnitus measures are susceptible to increased error due to priming and, if so, to examine the feasibility of using the Implicit Association Test (IAT; Greenwald, McGhee, & ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 2014
Use of the Implicit Association Test for the Measurement of Tinnitus-Related Distress
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • John Moring
    University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio
  • Anne Bowen
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Jenifer Thomas
    University of Wyoming, Laramie
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to John Morin: moringj@uthscsa.edu
  • Editor: Larry Humes
    Editor: Larry Humes×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 2014
Use of the Implicit Association Test for the Measurement of Tinnitus-Related Distress
American Journal of Audiology, September 2014, Vol. 23, 293-302. doi:10.1044/2014_AJA-14-0013
History: Received February 24, 2014 , Revised April 18, 2014 , Accepted April 22, 2014
 
American Journal of Audiology, September 2014, Vol. 23, 293-302. doi:10.1044/2014_AJA-14-0013
History: Received February 24, 2014; Revised April 18, 2014; Accepted April 22, 2014
Web of Science® Times Cited: 2

Purpose A priming stimulus activates and increases an association with the target stimulus. The goal of this research was to investigate whether current tinnitus measures are susceptible to increased error due to priming and, if so, to examine the feasibility of using the Implicit Association Test (IAT; Greenwald, McGhee, & Schwartz, 1998) for an alternative measurement of tinnitus-related distress.

Method Participants completed 2 tinnitus-related questionnaires and the IAT online.

Results Although participants with tinnitus did not view sound-related words as significantly more negative and IAT scores did not predict scores on the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (Newman, Jacobson, & Spitzer, 1996), priming did affect negative implicit attitudes toward sound-related words.

Conclusions On the basis of these results, it is suggested that current tinnitus measures may be susceptible to priming error and that future studies should continue to pursue how the IAT can be utilized in the measure of tinnitus-related distress. Moreover, researchers should develop overt-behavioral measurements that can assess the validity of a tinnitus IAT.

Acknowledgment
We thank the American Tinnitus Association for its support of this research and assistance in participant recruitment.
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