Effects of Policy Changes to Universal Newborn Hearing Screening Follow-Up in a University Clinic Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of policy changes on loss to follow-up rates and the ability to achieve the goals of the American Academy of Pediatrics Joint Committee on Infant Hearing Screening (2007)  for diagnosis of hearing loss by 3 months, amplification within 1 ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 2014
Effects of Policy Changes to Universal Newborn Hearing Screening Follow-Up in a University Clinic
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lata A. Krishnan
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Shannon Van Hyfte
    Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Lata A. Krishnan: krishnal@purdue.edu
  • Editor: Larry Humes
    Editor: Larry Humes×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Early Identification & Intervention / Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 2014
Effects of Policy Changes to Universal Newborn Hearing Screening Follow-Up in a University Clinic
American Journal of Audiology, September 2014, Vol. 23, 282-292. doi:10.1044/2014_AJA-14-0008
History: Received February 11, 2014 , Revised April 7, 2014 , Accepted April 13, 2014
 
American Journal of Audiology, September 2014, Vol. 23, 282-292. doi:10.1044/2014_AJA-14-0008
History: Received February 11, 2014; Revised April 7, 2014; Accepted April 13, 2014
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of policy changes on loss to follow-up rates and the ability to achieve the goals of the American Academy of Pediatrics Joint Committee on Infant Hearing Screening (2007)  for diagnosis of hearing loss by 3 months, amplification within 1 month of diagnosis, and start of intervention by 6 months.

Method From the files of 111 infants, data were extracted on the following: date of birth, birth hospital, hometown, parents' ages, ethnicity, nursery status, medical history, age at initial evaluation and diagnosis, results of evaluation(s), and age at hearing aid fitting and start of early intervention. Data were compared with previously published data from the clinic (Krishnan, 2009).

Results Policy changes led to a decrease in loss to follow-up and a younger age at diagnosis of hearing loss. Infants identified with hearing loss were fit with amplification at younger ages but not within 1 month of diagnosis of hearing loss. Policy changes had positive outcomes on loss to follow-up and age of diagnosis and amplification.

Conclusions Challenges remain in meeting the goals of amplification within 1 month of diagnosis and documenting the start of early intervention. Improved communication between and education of all parties involved in the care of infants is needed.

Acknowledgments
We thank Allison Witte, AuD student, for her assistance in gathering the data. We also thank all the infants and their families who chose to receive their diagnostic and follow-up care at the Purdue University Audiology Clinic. Portions of these data were presented at the annual convention of the American Speech-Language-Hearing Association in November 2012 in Atlanta, GA.
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