Amplitude Modulated S-Tones Can Be Superior to Noise for Tinnitus Reduction Purpose Recent evidence has suggested that amplitude modulated tones might have some advantages over broadband noise. Method Fifty-six subjects listened to S-Tones at a carrier frequency matched at the tinnitus pitch (amplitude modulation rate of 40 Hz) and to broadband noise. Subjects rated their tinnitus loudness before, during, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 2014
Amplitude Modulated S-Tones Can Be Superior to Noise for Tinnitus Reduction
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Richard Tyler
    University of Iowa, Iowa City
  • Christina Stocking
    University at Buffalo Speech-Language and Hearing Clinic, NY
  • Carrie Secor
    University at Buffalo Speech-Language and Hearing Clinic, NY
  • William H. Slattery, III
    House Clinic, Los Angeles, CA
  • Correspondence to Richard Tyler: rich-tyler@uiowa.edu
  • Disclosure: This study was partially funded by SoundCure. The first author was a consultant for SoundCure.
    Disclosure: This study was partially funded by SoundCure. The first author was a consultant for SoundCure.×
  • Editor: Larry Humes
    Editor: Larry Humes×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 2014
Amplitude Modulated S-Tones Can Be Superior to Noise for Tinnitus Reduction
American Journal of Audiology, September 2014, Vol. 23, 303-308. doi:10.1044/2014_AJA-14-0009
History: Received February 13, 2014 , Revised May 25, 2014 , Accepted June 27, 2014
 
American Journal of Audiology, September 2014, Vol. 23, 303-308. doi:10.1044/2014_AJA-14-0009
History: Received February 13, 2014; Revised May 25, 2014; Accepted June 27, 2014
Web of Science® Times Cited: 2

Purpose Recent evidence has suggested that amplitude modulated tones might have some advantages over broadband noise.

Method Fifty-six subjects listened to S-Tones at a carrier frequency matched at the tinnitus pitch (amplitude modulation rate of 40 Hz) and to broadband noise. Subjects rated their tinnitus loudness before, during, and after a 120-s duration masker.

Results The results suggested that S-Tones were generally more effective at reducing tinnitus loudness than noise. In about one third (21/56) of the subjects, there was no significant effect from any masker. In other subjects, 54.3% (19/35) showed a greater reduction for the S-Tones, 20% (7/35) showed a greater reduction with the noise, and 25.7% (9/35) showed similar performance between the 2 stimuli. The S-Tones showed a statistically significant benefit (p < .01) versus noise at reducing the patient's tinnitus perception. Using low-level stimuli that were rated much softer than the subjects' baseline tinnitus, the S-Tones reduced the tinnitus loudness by 1.9 times the amount that noise did (about 28% on average, whereas the noise reduced the tinnitus by about 15%).

Conclusion S-Tones at the tinnitus pitch-match frequency are more likely to be effective than broadband noise at reducing tinnitus loudness.

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