Effects of Low-Pass Filtering on the Perception of Word-Final Plurality Markers in Children and Adults With Normal Hearing Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of low-pass filtering on the detection of word-final /s/ and /z/ for children and adults with normal hearing. Method Stimuli were nouns from the University of Western Ontario Plurals Test (Glista & Scollie, 2012), low-pass filtered with ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 2014
Effects of Low-Pass Filtering on the Perception of Word-Final Plurality Markers in Children and Adults With Normal Hearing
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lori J. Leibold
    University of North Carolina School of Medicine
  • Hannah Hodson
    University of North Carolina School of Medicine
  • Ryan W. McCreery
    Boystown National Research Hospital
  • Lauren Calandruccio
    University of North Carolina School of Medicine
  • Emily Buss
    University of North Carolina School of Medicine
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Lori J. Leibold: leibold@med.unc.edu
  • Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes
    Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 2014
Effects of Low-Pass Filtering on the Perception of Word-Final Plurality Markers in Children and Adults With Normal Hearing
American Journal of Audiology, September 2014, Vol. 23, 351-358. doi:10.1044/2014_AJA-14-0003
History: Received January 18, 2014 , Revised June 23, 2014 , Accepted July 7, 2014
 
American Journal of Audiology, September 2014, Vol. 23, 351-358. doi:10.1044/2014_AJA-14-0003
History: Received January 18, 2014; Revised June 23, 2014; Accepted July 7, 2014
Web of Science® Times Cited: 3

Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of low-pass filtering on the detection of word-final /s/ and /z/ for children and adults with normal hearing.

Method Stimuli were nouns from the University of Western Ontario Plurals Test (Glista & Scollie, 2012), low-pass filtered with 5 different cutoff frequencies: 8000 Hz, 5000 Hz, 4000 Hz, 3000 Hz, and 2000 Hz. Listeners were children (age range = 7–13 years) and adults with normal hearing. The task was a 2-alternative forced-choice task with a picture-pointing response.

Results Performance was worse for lower than for higher low-pass filter cutoff frequencies, but the effect of low-pass filtering was similar for children and adults. Nearly all listeners achieved 100% correct performance when stimuli were low-pass filtered with cutoff frequencies of 8000 Hz or 5000 Hz. Performance remained well above chance even for the most severe filtering condition (2000 Hz). Restricting high-frequency audibility influenced performance for plural items to a greater extent than for singular items.

Conclusion The results indicate that children and adults with normal hearing can use acoustic information below the spectral range of frication noise typically associated with /s/ and /z/ to discriminate between singular and plural forms of nouns in the context of the University of Western Ontario Plurals Test.

Acknowledgments
This work was funded by National Institutes of Health Grant R01 DC 011038, awarded to Lori J. Leibold. We are grateful to Adam Jacks for his helpful suggestions and insights.
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