Older and Younger Adult Cochlear Implant Users: Speech Recognition in Quiet and Noise, Quality of Life, and Music Perception Purpose To determine whether older cochlear implant (CI) listeners differ from younger CI listeners on measures of speech understanding, music perception, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). In the study, the authors hypothesized that speech recognition would be more difficult for older adults, especially in noisy conditions. Performance on music ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 2015
Older and Younger Adult Cochlear Implant Users: Speech Recognition in Quiet and Noise, Quality of Life, and Music Perception
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Douglas P. Sladen
    Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
  • Amanda Zappler
    University of Texas at Austin
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Douglas Sladen: sladen.douglas@mayo.edu
  • Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes
    Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 2015
Older and Younger Adult Cochlear Implant Users: Speech Recognition in Quiet and Noise, Quality of Life, and Music Perception
American Journal of Audiology, March 2015, Vol. 24, 31-39. doi:10.1044/2014_AJA-13-0066
History: Received December 9, 2013 , Revised July 16, 2014 , Accepted August 31, 2014
 
American Journal of Audiology, March 2015, Vol. 24, 31-39. doi:10.1044/2014_AJA-13-0066
History: Received December 9, 2013; Revised July 16, 2014; Accepted August 31, 2014
Web of Science® Times Cited: 4

Purpose To determine whether older cochlear implant (CI) listeners differ from younger CI listeners on measures of speech understanding, music perception, and health-related quality of life (HRQoL). In the study, the authors hypothesized that speech recognition would be more difficult for older adults, especially in noisy conditions. Performance on music perception was expected to be lower for older implanted listeners. No differences between age groups were expected on HRQoL.

Method Twenty older (>60 years) and 20 younger (<60 years) implanted adults participated. Speech understanding was assessed using words and sentences presented in quiet, and sentences presented at +15, +10, and +5 dB signal-to-noise ratio conditions. Music perception was tested using the University of Washington Clinical Assessment of Music, and HRQoL was measured using the Njimegen CI survey.

Results Speech understanding was significantly lower for the older compared with the younger group in all conditions. Older implanted adults showed lower performance on music perception compared with younger implanted adults on 1 of 3 subtests. Older adults reported lower HRQoL benefit than younger adults on 3 of 6 subdomains.

Conclusion Data indicate that older CI listeners performed more poorly than younger CI listeners, although group differences appear to be task specific.

Acknowledgments
We thank Amy Gensler and Sara Morton for their assistance with subject recruitment. We also thank research assistants Kelly Corbet, Alexandria Solis, and Lisa Rodriquez for data collection and data entry. Finally, we extend our gratitude to the individuals who gave their time to participate in this study.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Audiology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access