It Is Time to Rethink Central Auditory Processing Disorder Protocols for School-Aged Children Purpose The purpose of this article is to review the literature that pertains to ongoing concerns regarding the central auditory processing construct among school-aged children and to assess whether the degree of uncertainty surrounding central auditory processing disorder (CAPD) warrants a change in current protocols. Method Methodology on ... Tutorial
Tutorial  |   June 01, 2015
It Is Time to Rethink Central Auditory Processing Disorder Protocols for School-Aged Children
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • David A. DeBonis
    The College of Saint Rose, Albany, NY
  • Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to David A. DeBonis: debonisd@strose.edu
  • Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes
    Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Language Disorders / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Tutorial
Tutorial   |   June 01, 2015
It Is Time to Rethink Central Auditory Processing Disorder Protocols for School-Aged Children
American Journal of Audiology, June 2015, Vol. 24, 124-136. doi:10.1044/2015_AJA-14-0037
History: Received July 31, 2014 , Revised December 10, 2014 , Accepted January 11, 2015
 
American Journal of Audiology, June 2015, Vol. 24, 124-136. doi:10.1044/2015_AJA-14-0037
History: Received July 31, 2014; Revised December 10, 2014; Accepted January 11, 2015
Web of Science® Times Cited: 12

Purpose The purpose of this article is to review the literature that pertains to ongoing concerns regarding the central auditory processing construct among school-aged children and to assess whether the degree of uncertainty surrounding central auditory processing disorder (CAPD) warrants a change in current protocols.

Method Methodology on this topic included a review of relevant and recent literature through electronic search tools (e.g., ComDisDome, PsycINFO, Medline, and Cochrane databases); published texts; as well as published articles from the Journal of the American Academy of Audiology; the American Journal of Audiology; the Journal of Speech, Language, and Hearing Research; and Language, Speech, and Hearing Services in Schools.

Results This review revealed strong support for the following: (a) Current testing of CAPD is highly influenced by nonauditory factors, including memory, attention, language, and executive function; (b) the lack of agreement regarding the performance criteria for diagnosis is concerning; (c) the contribution of auditory processing abilities to language, reading, and academic and listening abilities, as assessed by current measures, is not significant; and (d) the effectiveness of auditory interventions for improving communication abilities has not been established.

Conclusions Routine use of CAPD test protocols cannot be supported, and strong consideration should be given to redirecting focus on assessing overall listening abilities. Also, intervention needs to be contextualized and functional. A suggested protocol is provided for consideration. All of these issues warrant ongoing research.

Acknowledgments
Work on this article was supported by my friend and colleague, Kevin Ihrman, and my graduate assistant, Jamie Sharratt.
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