Outcomes of Group Audiological Rehabilitation for Unaided Adults With Hearing Impairment and Their Significant Others Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of a group audiological rehabilitation (GAR) program designed for working adults who do not use amplification and for their significant others. Method A quasirandomized control design was used to measure outcomes of the GAR program. Twenty-four couples ... Research Article
Research Article  |   March 01, 2015
Outcomes of Group Audiological Rehabilitation for Unaided Adults With Hearing Impairment and Their Significant Others
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • O. Lucía Habanec
    University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand
  • Rebecca J. Kelly-Campbell
    University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Rebecca Kelly-Campbell: rebecca.kelly@canterbury.ac.nz
  • Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes
    Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / Research Articles
Research Article   |   March 01, 2015
Outcomes of Group Audiological Rehabilitation for Unaided Adults With Hearing Impairment and Their Significant Others
American Journal of Audiology, March 2015, Vol. 24, 40-52. doi:10.1044/2015_AJA-14-0030
History: Received June 14, 2014 , Revised September 16, 2014 , Accepted November 8, 2014
 
American Journal of Audiology, March 2015, Vol. 24, 40-52. doi:10.1044/2015_AJA-14-0030
History: Received June 14, 2014; Revised September 16, 2014; Accepted November 8, 2014

Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate the outcomes of a group audiological rehabilitation (GAR) program designed for working adults who do not use amplification and for their significant others.

Method A quasirandomized control design was used to measure outcomes of the GAR program. Twenty-four couples participated in weekly GAR group sessions designed to address communication problems encountered in the workplace and at home. Twelve couples were placed on a waiting list as a control group. Assessments were completed at time frames prior to the sessions, post–waiting list, immediately after the sessions, and 12 weeks after. These included direct measures for the adults with hearing impairment, proxy measures from the significant others, and direct measures for the significant others.

Results Results indicated adults with hearing impairment and their significant others experienced significant improvements following participation in the GAR program. These improvements were maintained in the short term (12 weeks).

Conclusions Working adults with hearing impairment who do not use amplification can benefit from GAR sessions. Significant others of working adults with hearing impairment experience third-party disability, which can also be alleviated through participation in GAR sessions.

Acknowledgment
Funding for this research was provided in part by a grant from GN ReSound, awarded to the first author.
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