Temporal Processing Deficits in Middle Age Purpose The purpose of this brief report is to provide a synopsis of recent work, primarily from the authors' laboratory, that points to the emergence of temporal processing deficits relatively early in the aging process. Method The approach taken was to provide a descriptive summary of selected published ... Research Forum
Research Forum  |   June 01, 2015
Temporal Processing Deficits in Middle Age
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • John H. Grose
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Sara K. Mamo
    Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD
  • Emily Buss
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Joseph W. Hall, III
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to John H. Grose: jhg@med.unc.edu
  • Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes
    Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Research Forum: Changes in Sensory Perception in Middle-Aged Adults
Research Forum   |   June 01, 2015
Temporal Processing Deficits in Middle Age
American Journal of Audiology, June 2015, Vol. 24, 91-93. doi:10.1044/2015_AJA-14-0053
History: Received October 10, 2014 , Revised November 17, 2014 , Accepted November 21, 2014
 
American Journal of Audiology, June 2015, Vol. 24, 91-93. doi:10.1044/2015_AJA-14-0053
History: Received October 10, 2014; Revised November 17, 2014; Accepted November 21, 2014
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose The purpose of this brief report is to provide a synopsis of recent work, primarily from the authors' laboratory, that points to the emergence of temporal processing deficits relatively early in the aging process.

Method The approach taken was to provide a descriptive summary of selected published and current experiments focusing on the processing of temporal envelopes and fine structure.

Conclusion Deficits in both temporal envelope and temporal fine structure processing are evident during middle age even while audiometric hearing sensitivity remains normal.

Acknowledgments
This work was funded by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grants R01-DC001507 and R03-DC012278, awarded to John H. Grose.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Audiology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access