Listening Comprehension in Middle-Aged Adults Purpose The purpose of this summary is to examine changes in listening comprehension across the adult lifespan and to identify factors associated with individual differences in listening comprehension. Method In this article, the author reports on both cross-sectional and longitudinal changes in listening comprehension. Conclusions Despite ... Research Forum
Research Forum  |   June 01, 2015
Listening Comprehension in Middle-Aged Adults
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Mitchell S. Sommers
    Washington University in St. Louis, MO
  • Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Mitchell Sommers: msommers@wustl.edu
  • Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes
    Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research Forum: Changes in Sensory Perception in Middle-Aged Adults
Research Forum   |   June 01, 2015
Listening Comprehension in Middle-Aged Adults
American Journal of Audiology, June 2015, Vol. 24, 88-90. doi:10.1044/2015_AJA-14-0060
History: Received October 16, 2014 , Revised February 2, 2015 , Accepted February 5, 2015
 
American Journal of Audiology, June 2015, Vol. 24, 88-90. doi:10.1044/2015_AJA-14-0060
History: Received October 16, 2014; Revised February 2, 2015; Accepted February 5, 2015

Purpose The purpose of this summary is to examine changes in listening comprehension across the adult lifespan and to identify factors associated with individual differences in listening comprehension.

Method In this article, the author reports on both cross-sectional and longitudinal changes in listening comprehension.

Conclusions Despite significant declines in both sensory and cognitive abilities, listening comprehension remains relatively unchanged in middle-aged listeners (between the ages of 40 and 60 years) compared with young listeners. These results are discussed with respect to possible compensatory factors that maintain listening comprehension despite impaired hearing and reduced cognitive capacities.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Audiology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access