Acceptance Mediates the Relationship Between Tinnitus-Related Cognitions and Anxiety Sensitivity Purpose Negative cognitions related to tinnitus sensation have been previously shown to affect the level of emotional distress. Anxiety sensitivity is another psychological factor that influences individuals to more closely monitor their own bodily sensations, resulting in increased negative cognitions and negative emotional responses among tinnitus patients. However, increasing acceptance ... Research Article
Research Article  |   June 01, 2015
Acceptance Mediates the Relationship Between Tinnitus-Related Cognitions and Anxiety Sensitivity
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • John Moring
    University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio
  • Anne Bowen
    University of Arizona, Tucson
  • Jenifer Thomas
    University of Wyoming, Laramie
  • Jeremy Joseph
    University of Texas Health Science Center San Antonio
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to John Moring: moringj@uthscsa.edu
  • Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes
    Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   June 01, 2015
Acceptance Mediates the Relationship Between Tinnitus-Related Cognitions and Anxiety Sensitivity
American Journal of Audiology, June 2015, Vol. 24, 235-242. doi:10.1044/2015_AJA-15-0006
History: Received January 9, 2015 , Revised February 27, 2015 , Accepted March 22, 2015
 
American Journal of Audiology, June 2015, Vol. 24, 235-242. doi:10.1044/2015_AJA-15-0006
History: Received January 9, 2015; Revised February 27, 2015; Accepted March 22, 2015

Purpose Negative cognitions related to tinnitus sensation have been previously shown to affect the level of emotional distress. Anxiety sensitivity is another psychological factor that influences individuals to more closely monitor their own bodily sensations, resulting in increased negative cognitions and negative emotional responses among tinnitus patients. However, increasing acceptance of tinnitus sensation may attenuate emotional distress. The goal of this research was to investigate the relationship between negative tinnitus-related cognitions, acceptance, and anxiety sensitivity.

Method Two hundred sixty-seven participants completed online measures of the Tinnitus Handicap Inventory (Newman, Jacobson, & Spitzer, 1996), Acceptance and Action Questionnaire (Hayes, Follette, & Linehan, 2004), and the Anxiety Sensitivity Index–3 (Taylor et al., 2007).

Results Hierarchical regression analyses indicated that acceptance fully mediated the relationship between negative tinnitus-related cognitions and anxiety sensitivity.

Conclusions On the basis of these results, it is suggested that practitioners improve acceptance of tinnitus sensation, duration, and intensity. More research is warranted on the clinical techniques to improve acceptance.

Acknowledgment
We thank the American Tinnitus Association for the support of this research and the assistance in participant recruitment.
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