“You Can Lead a Horse to Water …”: Focus Group Perspectives on Initiating and Supporting Hearing Health Change in Older Adults Purpose The aim of this study was to use focus group discussions to (a) evaluate the use of an educational presentation as an impetus for hearing health change and (b) investigate hearing health from the perspective of older adults. Method Twenty-seven (4 men, 23 women) community-dwelling older adults ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 2015
“You Can Lead a Horse to Water …”: Focus Group Perspectives on Initiating and Supporting Hearing Health Change in Older Adults
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Heather V. Holliday
    The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
  • Lorienne M. Jenstad
    The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
  • Garnet Grosjean
    The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
  • Barbara Purves
    The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Lorienne M. Jenstad: ljenstad@audiospeech.ubc.ca
  • Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes
    Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 2015
“You Can Lead a Horse to Water …”: Focus Group Perspectives on Initiating and Supporting Hearing Health Change in Older Adults
American Journal of Audiology, September 2015, Vol. 24, 360-376. doi:10.1044/2015_AJA-14-0073
History: Received November 18, 2014 , Revised March 19, 2015 , Accepted March 22, 2015
 
American Journal of Audiology, September 2015, Vol. 24, 360-376. doi:10.1044/2015_AJA-14-0073
History: Received November 18, 2014; Revised March 19, 2015; Accepted March 22, 2015

Purpose The aim of this study was to use focus group discussions to (a) evaluate the use of an educational presentation as an impetus for hearing health change and (b) investigate hearing health from the perspective of older adults.

Method Twenty-seven (4 men, 23 women) community-dwelling older adults attended 4 data collection events. Participants attended a presentation titled Hearing Health in Older Adults, which was delivered by a trained presenter in a peer-teaching-peer format. Following each presentation, a focus group discussion took place. Digital audio recordings, field notes, and memos of the discussions were used to create verbatim transcripts. Data were analyzed using qualitative description and thematic analysis techniques.

Results Five central themes emerged when older adult focus groups discussed the presentation and hearing health change: recognizing and admitting, understanding the options, sharing stories and experiences, barriers and facilitators, and the presentation.

Conclusion Facilitators to hearing health change identified by participants include widespread education about hearing health; clarification about roles, professional motivation, and cost in hearing care; and opportunities to learn from and share personal stories with peers.

Acknowledgments
This project was undertaken with the Council of Senior Citizens' Organizations of British Columbia (COSCO). Several individuals provided invaluable assistance with the development of the presentation Hearing Health in Older Adults: Sheila Pither and Sylvia MacLeay (COSCO), Martha Donnelly (The University of British Columbia [UBC]), Krista Frazee (Simon Fraser University), Jean Jones (Senior Mentors Assisting Researchers and Trainees [SMART] mentor), and Katie MacDonald (UBC). Catherine (Craven) Tong (UBC) moderated the focus groups. Funding used in the development of the COSCO presentation was provided by the Care for Elders, Faculty of Medicine, UBC, and a Canadian Institutes for Health Research Health Professional Research Scholarship and was awarded to Heather V. Holliday.
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