Cognitive Decline and Hearing Health Care for Older Adults Purpose The purpose of this article is to consider the implications of age-related cognitive decline for hearing health care. Method Recent research and current thinking about age-related declines in cognition and the links between auditory and cognitive aging are reviewed briefly. Implications of this research for improving prevention, ... Research Forum
Research Forum  |   June 01, 2015
Cognitive Decline and Hearing Health Care for Older Adults
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • M. Kathleen Pichora-Fuller
    University of Toronto, Ontario, Canada
    Linneaus Centre HEAD, Linköping University, Sweden
  • Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to M. Kathleen Pichora-Fuller: k.pichora.fuller@utoronto.ca
  • Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes
    Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research Forum: Hearing Health Care for the Oldest Older Adults
Research Forum   |   June 01, 2015
Cognitive Decline and Hearing Health Care for Older Adults
American Journal of Audiology, June 2015, Vol. 24, 108-111. doi:10.1044/2015_AJA-14-0076
History: Received November 28, 2014 , Accepted January 11, 2015
 
American Journal of Audiology, June 2015, Vol. 24, 108-111. doi:10.1044/2015_AJA-14-0076
History: Received November 28, 2014; Accepted January 11, 2015
Web of Science® Times Cited: 3

Purpose The purpose of this article is to consider the implications of age-related cognitive decline for hearing health care.

Method Recent research and current thinking about age-related declines in cognition and the links between auditory and cognitive aging are reviewed briefly. Implications of this research for improving prevention, assessment, and intervention in audiologic practice and for enhancing interprofessional teamwork are highlighted.

Conclusions Given the important connection between auditory and cognitive aging and given the high prevalence of both hearing and cognitive impairments in the oldest older adults, health care services could be improved by taking into account how both the ear and the brain change over the life span. By incorporating cognitive factors into audiologic prevention, assessment, and intervention, hearing health care can contribute to better hearing and communication as well as to healthy aging.

Acknowledgment
This article was presented in the forum “The Challenges in Hearing Health Care for the Oldest Older Adults” (coordinated by Judy Dubno) at the HEAL (HEaring Across the Lifespan) conference “Early Intervention: The Key to Better Hearing Care,” June 5, 2014, in Lake Como, Italy.
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