About Cognitive Outcome Measures at Ecological Signal-to-Noise Ratios and Cognitive-Driven Hearing Aid Signal Processing Purpose The purpose of this article is to discuss 2 questions concerning how hearing aids interact with hearing and cognition: Can signal processing in hearing aids improve memory? Can attention be used for top-down control of hearing aids? Method Memory recall of sentences, presented at 95% correct speech ... Research Forum
Research Forum  |   June 01, 2015
About Cognitive Outcome Measures at Ecological Signal-to-Noise Ratios and Cognitive-Driven Hearing Aid Signal Processing
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Thomas Lunner
    Linköping University, Sweden
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Oticon A/S, Smørum, Denmark
  • Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Thomas Lunner: tlu@eriksholm.com
  • Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes
    Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research Forum: The Brain and Hearing Aids
Research Forum   |   June 01, 2015
About Cognitive Outcome Measures at Ecological Signal-to-Noise Ratios and Cognitive-Driven Hearing Aid Signal Processing
American Journal of Audiology, June 2015, Vol. 24, 121-123. doi:10.1044/2015_AJA-14-0066
History: Received November 5, 2014 , Revised February 22, 2015 , Accepted March 1, 2015
 
American Journal of Audiology, June 2015, Vol. 24, 121-123. doi:10.1044/2015_AJA-14-0066
History: Received November 5, 2014; Revised February 22, 2015; Accepted March 1, 2015

Purpose The purpose of this article is to discuss 2 questions concerning how hearing aids interact with hearing and cognition: Can signal processing in hearing aids improve memory? Can attention be used for top-down control of hearing aids?

Method Memory recall of sentences, presented at 95% correct speech recognition, was assessed with and without binary mask noise reduction. A short literature review was performed on recent findings on new brain-imaging techniques showing potential for hearing aid control.

Conclusions Two experiments indicate that it is possible to show improved memory with an experimental noise reduction algorithm at ecological signal-to-noise ratios and that it is possible to replicate these findings in a new language. The literature indicates that attention-controlled hearing aids may be developed in the future.

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