Physiological Measures and Their Potential for the Assessment of Pediatric Hearing Needs Purpose The purpose of this article is to discuss how cortical auditory evoked potentials might be used to assess speech perception capacity in infants, including acoustic change complex data collected in our laboratory. This article is a summary of a paper presented at the HEaring Across the Lifespan (HEAL) Conference ... Research Forum
Research Forum  |   June 01, 2015
Physiological Measures and Their Potential for the Assessment of Pediatric Hearing Needs
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Susan A. Small
    The University of British Columbia, Vancouver, Canada
  • Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Susan A. Small: ssmall@audiospeech.ubc.ca
  • Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes
    Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Research Forum: The Brain and Hearing Aids
Research Forum   |   June 01, 2015
Physiological Measures and Their Potential for the Assessment of Pediatric Hearing Needs
American Journal of Audiology, June 2015, Vol. 24, 113-116. doi:10.1044/2015_AJA-14-0070
History: Received November 11, 2014 , Revised February 17, 2015 , Accepted March 1, 2015
 
American Journal of Audiology, June 2015, Vol. 24, 113-116. doi:10.1044/2015_AJA-14-0070
History: Received November 11, 2014; Revised February 17, 2015; Accepted March 1, 2015

Purpose The purpose of this article is to discuss how cortical auditory evoked potentials might be used to assess speech perception capacity in infants, including acoustic change complex data collected in our laboratory. This article is a summary of a paper presented at the HEaring Across the Lifespan (HEAL) Conference held June 5–7, 2014, in Cernobbio, Italy.

Method Highlights from data collected in infants and the main issues needing investigation for clinical application are presented.

Conclusions Preliminary studies show promising results for the acoustic change complex and confirm that further inquiry into its clinical application is warranted. The presence of an onset response can be used clinically to confirm that auditory information has reached the cortex; however, the absence of a response cannot be interpreted with confidence.

Acknowledgments
This article is based on the first paper presented in the invited session “The Brain and Hearing Aids: Considerations for Children, Younger and Older Adults,” organized by Kathy Pichora-Fuller at the HEaring Across the Lifespan (HEAL) Conference held June 5–7, 2014, in Cernobbio, Italy.
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