Bimodal Programming: A Survey of Current Clinical Practice Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine the current clinical practice in approaches to bimodal programming in the United States. To be specific, if clinicians are recommending bimodal stimulation, who programs the hearing aid in the bimodal condition, and what method is used for programming the hearing aid? ... Research Note
Research Note  |   June 01, 2015
Bimodal Programming: A Survey of Current Clinical Practice
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Hannah W. Siburt
    University of Florida, Gainesville
  • Alice E. Holmes
    University of Florida, Gainesville
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.×
  • Correspondence to Hannah W. Siburt: hsiburt@phhp.ufl.edu
  • Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes
    Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes×
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Research Note
Research Note   |   June 01, 2015
Bimodal Programming: A Survey of Current Clinical Practice
American Journal of Audiology, June 2015, Vol. 24, 243-249. doi:10.1044/2015_AJA-14-0069
History: Received November 19, 2014 , Revised April 7, 2015 , Accepted April 19, 2015
 
American Journal of Audiology, June 2015, Vol. 24, 243-249. doi:10.1044/2015_AJA-14-0069
History: Received November 19, 2014; Revised April 7, 2015; Accepted April 19, 2015
Web of Science® Times Cited: 2

Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine the current clinical practice in approaches to bimodal programming in the United States. To be specific, if clinicians are recommending bimodal stimulation, who programs the hearing aid in the bimodal condition, and what method is used for programming the hearing aid?

Method An 11-question online survey was created and sent via email to a comprehensive list of cochlear implant programming centers in the United States. The survey was sent to 360 recipients.

Results Respondents in this study represented a diverse group of clinical settings (response rate: 26%). Results indicate little agreement about who programs the hearing aids, when they are programmed, and how they are programmed in the bimodal condition. Analysis of small versus large implant centers indicated small centers are less likely to add a device to the contralateral ear.

Conclusions Although a growing number of cochlear implant recipients choose to wear a hearing aid on the contralateral ear, there is inconsistency in the current clinical approach to bimodal programming. These survey results provide evidence of large variability in the current bimodal programming practices and indicate a need for more structured clinical recommendations and programming approaches.

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