A Comparison of Two Methods for Measuring Listening Effort As Part of an Audiologic Test Battery Purpose We evaluated 2 measures of listening effort (a self-report measure and a word recall measure) regarding their suitability for inclusion in a comprehensive audiologic testing protocol. The relationship between the 2 measures was explored, and both measures were examined with regard to validity, sensitivity, and effect on speech intelligibility ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 2015
A Comparison of Two Methods for Measuring Listening Effort As Part of an Audiologic Test Battery
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jani Johnson
    Hearing Aid Research Laboratory, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN
  • Jingjing Xu
    Hearing Aid Research Laboratory, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN
  • Robyn Cox
    Hearing Aid Research Laboratory, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN
  • Paul Pendergraft
    Hearing Aid Research Laboratory, University of Memphis, Memphis, TN
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Jani Johnson: jajhns10@memphis.edu.
  • Paul Pendergraft is now at The National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research, Portland Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Portland, OR.
    Paul Pendergraft is now at The National Center for Rehabilitative Auditory Research, Portland Veterans Affairs Medical Center, Portland, OR.×
  • Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes
    Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes×
Article Information
Speech, Voice & Prosodic Disorders / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 2015
A Comparison of Two Methods for Measuring Listening Effort As Part of an Audiologic Test Battery
American Journal of Audiology, September 2015, Vol. 24, 419-431. doi:10.1044/2015_AJA-14-0058
History: Received October 16, 2014 , Revised May 4, 2015 , Accepted May 17, 2015
 
American Journal of Audiology, September 2015, Vol. 24, 419-431. doi:10.1044/2015_AJA-14-0058
History: Received October 16, 2014; Revised May 4, 2015; Accepted May 17, 2015
Web of Science® Times Cited: 3

Purpose We evaluated 2 measures of listening effort (a self-report measure and a word recall measure) regarding their suitability for inclusion in a comprehensive audiologic testing protocol. The relationship between the 2 measures was explored, and both measures were examined with regard to validity, sensitivity, and effect on speech intelligibility performance.

Method Thirty adults with normal hearing participated. Speech intelligibility performance was evaluated at 4 signal-to-noise ratios by using keywords embedded in both high- and low-context sentences. Listening effort was evaluated at set intervals throughout the speech intelligibility task.

Results Results obtained with the 2 measures were consistent with expected changes in listening effort. However, data obtained with the self-report method demonstrated greater sensitivity to these changes. The 2 measures were uncorrelated. Under certain conditions, speech intelligibility performance was more negatively affected when the word recall measure was used. Exploration of additional theoretical and practical considerations supported a conclusion that the self-report measure was preferable for measuring listening effort simultaneously with speech intelligibility.

Conclusion The results of this study provide a rationale for preferring the self-report measure of listening effort over the word recall measure when testing audiologic outcomes.

Acknowledgments
This research was funded in part by National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders Grant RO1 DC011550, awarded to the third author.
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