Clinician-Supported Internet-Delivered Psychological Treatment of Tinnitus Purpose Internet-delivered psychological treatments for tinnitus distress have existed for more than 15 years, and there are a slowly growing number of studies. The aim of this brief report is to review the evidence and to comment on the future potentials of Internet treatments for tinnitus. Method Studies ... Research Forum
Research Forum  |   September 01, 2015
Clinician-Supported Internet-Delivered Psychological Treatment of Tinnitus
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Gerhard Andersson
    Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Sweden
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden
  • Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Gerhard Andersson: gerhard.andersson@liu.se
  • Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes
    Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Research Forum: Internet and Audiology
Research Forum   |   September 01, 2015
Clinician-Supported Internet-Delivered Psychological Treatment of Tinnitus
American Journal of Audiology, September 2015, Vol. 24, 299-301. doi:10.1044/2015_AJA-14-0080
History: Received December 10, 2014 , Revised March 7, 2015 , Accepted March 22, 2015
 
American Journal of Audiology, September 2015, Vol. 24, 299-301. doi:10.1044/2015_AJA-14-0080
History: Received December 10, 2014; Revised March 7, 2015; Accepted March 22, 2015
Web of Science® Times Cited: 4

Purpose Internet-delivered psychological treatments for tinnitus distress have existed for more than 15 years, and there are a slowly growing number of studies. The aim of this brief report is to review the evidence and to comment on the future potentials of Internet treatments for tinnitus.

Method Studies were retrieved, and in total 6 controlled studies were included in the review with 9 different comparisons (6 in which the treatment was compared against a control group and 3 in which Internet treatment was compared against group treatment). Moreover, 2 open studies based on clinical samples in regular care were also included in the review. The outcomes for the 2 controlled sets of studies were analyzed using meta-analytic methods.

Results For the 6 studies comparing Internet treatment against a no-treatment control condition, a moderate effect size was found (Hedges's g = 0.58). The 3 studies comparing Internet treatment against face-to-face group treatments showed a small difference of Hedges's g = 0.13.

Conclusions Internet-delivered psychological treatment holds promise as a treatment alternative to other standard forms of treatment delivery, including group treatment. Larger studies are needed as well as ways to blend information technology with regular services.

Acknowledgments
I thank Forte and Hörselfonden for financial support. I also thank my coworkers and former PhD students—Viktor Kaldo, Vendela Zetterqvist, and Hugo Hesser—and postdoc Cornelia Weise for their work on the ICBT projects. Last, I am grateful to the late Jeff Richards for our collaboration in Australia.
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