The Development of Balance Retraining: An Online Intervention for Dizziness in Adults Aged 50 Years and Older Purpose This article outlines the rationale and development process for an online intervention based on vestibular rehabilitation therapy (VRT). The intervention aims to assist adults aged 50 years and older to self-manage and reduce dizziness symptoms. Method The intervention was developed according to the person-based approach to digital ... Research Forum
Research Forum  |   September 01, 2015
The Development of Balance Retraining: An Online Intervention for Dizziness in Adults Aged 50 Years and Older
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Rosie Essery
    University of Southampton, United Kingdom
  • Sarah Kirby
    University of Southampton, United Kingdom
  • Adam W. A. Geraghty
    University of Southampton, United Kingdom
  • Gerhard Andersson
    Linnaeus Centre HEAD, Swedish Institute for Disability Research, Linköping University, Sweden
    Karolinska Institute, Stockholm, Sweden
  • Per Carlbring
    Stockholm University, Sweden
  • Adolfo Bronstein
    Imperial College London, United Kingdom
  • Paul Little
    University of Southampton, United Kingdom
  • Lucy Yardley
    University of Southampton, United Kingdom
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Rosie Essery: r.a.essery@soton.ac.uk
  • Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes
    Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes×
Article Information
Balance & Balance Disorders / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Research Forum: Internet and Audiology
Research Forum   |   September 01, 2015
The Development of Balance Retraining: An Online Intervention for Dizziness in Adults Aged 50 Years and Older
American Journal of Audiology, September 2015, Vol. 24, 276-279. doi:10.1044/2015_AJA-14-0081
History: Received December 11, 2014 , Revised February 22, 2015 , Accepted March 1, 2015
 
American Journal of Audiology, September 2015, Vol. 24, 276-279. doi:10.1044/2015_AJA-14-0081
History: Received December 11, 2014; Revised February 22, 2015; Accepted March 1, 2015
Web of Science® Times Cited: 2

Purpose This article outlines the rationale and development process for an online intervention based on vestibular rehabilitation therapy (VRT). The intervention aims to assist adults aged 50 years and older to self-manage and reduce dizziness symptoms.

Method The intervention was developed according to the person-based approach to digital intervention design focused on accommodating perspectives of target users. A prototype version of the intervention was provided to 18 adults (11 women, 7 men) aged 50 years and older with dizziness. These adults were invited to use the intervention over a 6-week period and, during this time, took part in a think-aloud session. This session sought to understand users' perceptions of how acceptable, engaging, and easy to use they found the online intervention.

Results Users were extremely positive regarding how easy to navigate, visually appealing, and informative they found the intervention. Think-aloud sessions provided valuable data for informing small amendments to further enhance acceptability of the intervention for target users.

Conclusions Informed by these development-phase data, a finalized version of the intervention is now being investigated in a primary care–based randomized controlled trial. Results should provide an understanding of whether VRT can be effectively—especially, cost-effectively—delivered via an online intervention to adults aged 50 years and older.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by Dunhill Medical Trust Grant R222/1111. This brief report summarizes an oral presentation delivered at the Internet and Audiology Conference in Linköping, Sweden, on October 4, 2014.
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