The Effect of Chronological Age on the Acceptance of Internet-Based Hearing Health Care Purpose The purpose of this article is to offer design considerations in developing Internet-based hearing health care for older adults by analyzing and discussing the relationship between chronological age, computer skills, and the acceptance of Internet-based hearing health care. Method This article reports baseline data from a training ... Research Forum
Research Forum  |   September 01, 2015
The Effect of Chronological Age on the Acceptance of Internet-Based Hearing Health Care
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ashley N. Moore
    University of Louisville, KY
  • Ann M. Rothpletz
    University of Louisville, KY
  • Jill E. Preminger
    University of Louisville, KY
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Ann Rothpletz: ann.rothpletz@louisville.edu
  • Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes
    Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Research Forum: Internet and Audiology
Research Forum   |   September 01, 2015
The Effect of Chronological Age on the Acceptance of Internet-Based Hearing Health Care
American Journal of Audiology, September 2015, Vol. 24, 280-283. doi:10.1044/2015_AJA-14-0082
History: Received December 12, 2014 , Revised March 4, 2015 , Accepted March 22, 2015
 
American Journal of Audiology, September 2015, Vol. 24, 280-283. doi:10.1044/2015_AJA-14-0082
History: Received December 12, 2014; Revised March 4, 2015; Accepted March 22, 2015
Web of Science® Times Cited: 2

Purpose The purpose of this article is to offer design considerations in developing Internet-based hearing health care for older adults by analyzing and discussing the relationship between chronological age, computer skills, and the acceptance of Internet-based hearing health care.

Method This article reports baseline data from a training study measuring the acceptance of Internet-based hearing health care. Participants (n = 26; 20 men, 6 women) were aged 55–95 years. All passed a cognitive screen and failed a hearing screen. Participants completed the Patient-Technology Acceptance questionnaire (Or, 2008). Computer literacy was measured using the Northstar Digital Literacy Assessment (Cytron-Hysom, Hadley, Vanek, Graif, & Asp, 2012).

Results Computer literacy was negatively correlated with increasing age. Additional negative relationships were seen between computer literacy and computer anxiety and between computer literacy and computer self-efficacy. Finally, there was a negative relationship between computer self-efficacy and computer anxiety.

Conclusion These results suggest computer literacy is lower in adults of advanced age than in those who are a few years younger. Indirect relationships were observed between age and computer self-efficacy and between age and computer anxiety. Consideration should be given to addressing discrepancies in self-efficacy and computer literacy in older adults to increase the likelihood of acceptance of Internet-based hearing health care.

Acknowledgments
This research was made possible by a basic grant from the University of Louisville School of Medicine. This work was presented in October 2014 at the Internet and Audiology Conference in Linköping, Sweden. The authors wish to extend their gratitude to the staff and administration at the Jewish Community Center, Oak and Acorn, Miralea, and Oxmoor Lodge for graciously assisting in participant recruitment and for the use of their facilities. Additional gratitude goes to Margaret Barnet and Rebecca Hauff for their assistance in managing the database and to Ragaraj Golpalraj and Renee Gridler for their assistance in subject recruitment.
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