Computer and Internet Interventions to Optimize Listening and Learning for People With Hearing Loss: Accessibility, Use, and Adherence Purpose The aim of this research forum article was to examine accessibility, use, and adherence to computerized and online interventions for people with hearing loss. Method Four intervention studies of people with hearing loss were examined: 2 auditory training studies, 1 working memory training study, and 1 study ... Research Forum
Research Forum  |   September 01, 2015
Computer and Internet Interventions to Optimize Listening and Learning for People With Hearing Loss: Accessibility, Use, and Adherence
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Melanie Ferguson
    NIHR Nottingham Hearing Biomedical Research Unit, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, United Kingdom
  • Helen Henshaw
    NIHR Nottingham Hearing Biomedical Research Unit, Otology and Hearing Research Group, Division of Clinical Neuroscience,University of Nottingham, United Kingdom
  • Disclosure: The Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust and University of Nottingham will receive a small proportion of any royalties from the sale of the C2Hear RLOs. There will be no payment made to any individual member of the research team.
    Disclosure: The Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust and University of Nottingham will receive a small proportion of any royalties from the sale of the C2Hear RLOs. There will be no payment made to any individual member of the research team. ×
  • Correspondence to Melanie Ferguson: melanie.ferguson@nottingham.ac.uk
  • Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes
    Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research Forum: Internet and Audiology
Research Forum   |   September 01, 2015
Computer and Internet Interventions to Optimize Listening and Learning for People With Hearing Loss: Accessibility, Use, and Adherence
American Journal of Audiology, September 2015, Vol. 24, 338-343. doi:10.1044/2015_AJA-14-0090
History: Received December 19, 2014 , Revised April 2, 2015 , Accepted April 10, 2015
 
American Journal of Audiology, September 2015, Vol. 24, 338-343. doi:10.1044/2015_AJA-14-0090
History: Received December 19, 2014; Revised April 2, 2015; Accepted April 10, 2015
Web of Science® Times Cited: 3

Purpose The aim of this research forum article was to examine accessibility, use, and adherence to computerized and online interventions for people with hearing loss.

Method Four intervention studies of people with hearing loss were examined: 2 auditory training studies, 1 working memory training study, and 1 study of multimedia educational support.

Results A small proportion (approximately 15%) of participants had never used a computer, which may be a barrier to the accessibility of computer and Internet-based interventions. Computer competence was not a factor in intervention use or adherence. Computer skills and Internet access influenced participant preference for the delivery method of the multimedia educational support program.

Conclusions It is important to be aware of current barriers to computer and Internet-delivered interventions for people with hearing loss. However, there is a clear need to develop and future-proof hearing-related applications for online delivery.

Acknowledgments
This research forum article presents independent research funded by the National Institute for Health Research (NIHR) Biomedical Research Unit Programme and the NIHR Research for Patient Benefit Programme (Grant PB-PG-0909-20294), awarded to Melanie Ferguson. The views expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the NHS, the NIHR, or the Department of Health. The Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust and University of Nottingham will receive a small proportion of any royalties from the sale of the C2Hear RLOs. There will be no payment made to any individual member of the research team. We would like to thank our colleagues who made significant contributions to the intervention studies: Dave Moore, Dan Clark, Ashana Tittle, Heather Wharrad, Marian Brandreth, Holly Thomas, and William Brassington.
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