Can a Remotely Delivered Auditory Training Program Improve Speech-in-Noise Understanding? Purpose The aims of this study were to determine if a remotely delivered, Internet-based auditory training (AT) program improved speech-in-noise understanding and if the number of hours spent engaged in the program influenced postintervention speech-in-noise understanding. Method Twenty-nine first-time hearing aid users were randomized into an AT group ... Research Forum
Research Forum  |   September 01, 2015
Can a Remotely Delivered Auditory Training Program Improve Speech-in-Noise Understanding?
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Harvey B. Abrams
    Starkey Hearing Technologies, Eden Prairie, MN
    University of South Florida, Tampa
  • Kirsten Bock
    University of Minnesota Medical Center-Fairview, Minneapolis
  • Ryan L. Irey
    Starkey Hearing Technologies, Eden Prairie, MN
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Harvey Abrams: harvey_abrams@starkey.com
  • Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes
    Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Audiologic / Aural Rehabilitation / Research Forum: Internet and Audiology
Research Forum   |   September 01, 2015
Can a Remotely Delivered Auditory Training Program Improve Speech-in-Noise Understanding?
American Journal of Audiology, September 2015, Vol. 24, 333-337. doi:10.1044/2015_AJA-15-0002
History: Received January 5, 2015 , Revised April 16, 2015 , Accepted April 19, 2015
 
American Journal of Audiology, September 2015, Vol. 24, 333-337. doi:10.1044/2015_AJA-15-0002
History: Received January 5, 2015; Revised April 16, 2015; Accepted April 19, 2015

Purpose The aims of this study were to determine if a remotely delivered, Internet-based auditory training (AT) program improved speech-in-noise understanding and if the number of hours spent engaged in the program influenced postintervention speech-in-noise understanding.

Method Twenty-nine first-time hearing aid users were randomized into an AT group (hearing aids + 3 week remotely delivered, Internet-based auditory training program) or a control group (hearing aids alone). The Hearing in Noise Test (Nilsson, Soli, & Sullivan, 1994) and the Words-in-Noise test (Wilson, 2003) were administered to both groups at baseline + 1 week and immediately at the completion of the 3 weeks of auditory training.

Results Speech-in-noise understanding improved for both groups at the completion of the study; however, there was not a statistically significant difference in postintervention improvement between the AT and control groups. Although the number of hours the participants engaged in the AT program was far fewer than prescribed, time on task influenced the postintervention Words-in-Noise but not Hearing in Noise Test scores.

Conclusion Although remotely delivered, Internet-based AT programs represent an attractive alternative to resource-intensive, clinic-based interventions, their demonstrated efficacy continues to remain a challenge due in part to issues associated with compliance.

Acknowledgments
Portions of this paper were presented at the NCRAR Biennial Conference, Portland, OR, September 18–20, 2013, and the First International Meeting on Internet & Audiology, Linköping, Sweden, October 3–4, 2014. Harvey B. Abrams and Ryan L. Irey are employees of Starkey Hearing Technologies. ReadmyQuips is distributed by Starkey Hearing Technologies.
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