Readability of Internet Information on Hearing: Systematic Literature Review Purpose This systematic literature review asks the following question: “What is the readability of Internet information on hearing that people with hearing impairment and their significant others can access in the context of their hearing care?” Method Searches were completed in three databases: CINAHL, PubMed, and Scopus. Seventy-eight ... Research Forum
Research Forum  |   September 01, 2015
Readability of Internet Information on Hearing: Systematic Literature Review
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ariane Laplante-Lévesque
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark
    Linköping University, Linköping, Sweden
  • Elisabet Sundewall Thorén
    Eriksholm Research Centre, Snekkersten, Denmark
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Ariane Laplante-Lévesque: arll@eriksholm.com
  • Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes
    Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Telepractice & Computer-Based Approaches / Research Forum: Internet and Audiology
Research Forum   |   September 01, 2015
Readability of Internet Information on Hearing: Systematic Literature Review
American Journal of Audiology, September 2015, Vol. 24, 284-288. doi:10.1044/2015_AJA-14-0091
History: Received December 20, 2014 , Revised March 23, 2015 , Accepted March 29, 2015
 
American Journal of Audiology, September 2015, Vol. 24, 284-288. doi:10.1044/2015_AJA-14-0091
History: Received December 20, 2014; Revised March 23, 2015; Accepted March 29, 2015
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose This systematic literature review asks the following question: “What is the readability of Internet information on hearing that people with hearing impairment and their significant others can access in the context of their hearing care?”

Method Searches were completed in three databases: CINAHL, PubMed, and Scopus. Seventy-eight records were identified and systematically screened for eligibility: 8 records were included that contained data on the readability of Internet information on hearing that people with hearing impairment and their significant others can access in the context of their hearing care.

Results Records reported mean readability levels from 9 to over 14. In other words, people with hearing impairment and their significant others need 9 to 14 years of education to read and understand Internet information on hearing that they access in the context of their hearing care.

Conclusion The poor readability of Internet information on hearing has been well documented; it is time to focus on valid and sustainable initiatives that address this problem.

Acknowledgments
Part of this work was presented at the First International Meeting on Internet and Audiology, Linköping, Sweden, October 3–4, 2014.
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