Information Retention and Overload in First-Time Hearing Aid Users: An Interactive Multimedia Educational Solution Purpose An educational intervention to improve knowledge of hearing aids and communication in first-time hearing aid users was assessed. This intervention was based on the concept of reusable learning objects (RLOs). Method A randomized controlled trial was conducted. One group received the educational intervention, and the other acted ... Research Forum
Research Forum  |   September 01, 2015
Information Retention and Overload in First-Time Hearing Aid Users: An Interactive Multimedia Educational Solution
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Melanie Ferguson
    NIHR Nottingham Hearing Biomedical Research Unit, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, United Kingdom
    NIHR Nottingham Hearing Biomedical Research Unit, Otology and Hearing Research Group, Division of Clinical Neuroscience, University of Nottingham, United Kingdom
  • Marian Brandreth
    NIHR Nottingham Hearing Biomedical Research Unit, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, United Kingdom
  • William Brassington
    Nottingham Audiology Service, Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust, United Kingdom
  • Heather Wharrad
    University of Nottingham, United Kingdom
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. The views expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the National Health Service, the National Institute for Health Research, or the Department of Health. The Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust and University of Nottingham will receive a small portion of any royalties from the sale of the C2Hear reusable learning objects. No payment will be made to any individual member of the research team.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. The views expressed are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the National Health Service, the National Institute for Health Research, or the Department of Health. The Nottingham University Hospitals NHS Trust and University of Nottingham will receive a small portion of any royalties from the sale of the C2Hear reusable learning objects. No payment will be made to any individual member of the research team.×
  • Correspondence to Melanie Ferguson: melanie.ferguson@nottingham.ac.uk
  • Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes
    Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes×
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Research Forum: Internet and Audiology
Research Forum   |   September 01, 2015
Information Retention and Overload in First-Time Hearing Aid Users: An Interactive Multimedia Educational Solution
American Journal of Audiology, September 2015, Vol. 24, 329-332. doi:10.1044/2015_AJA-14-0088
History: Received December 21, 2014 , Revised April 5, 2015 , Accepted April 10, 2015
 
American Journal of Audiology, September 2015, Vol. 24, 329-332. doi:10.1044/2015_AJA-14-0088
History: Received December 21, 2014; Revised April 5, 2015; Accepted April 10, 2015
Web of Science® Times Cited: 3

Purpose An educational intervention to improve knowledge of hearing aids and communication in first-time hearing aid users was assessed. This intervention was based on the concept of reusable learning objects (RLOs).

Method A randomized controlled trial was conducted. One group received the educational intervention, and the other acted as a control group. RLOs were delivered online and through DVD for television and personal computer. Knowledge of both practical and psychosocial aspects of hearing aids and communication was assessed using a free-recall method 6 weeks postfitting.

Results Knowledge of both practical and psychosocial issues was significantly higher in the group that received the RLOs than in the control group. Moderate to large effect sizes indicated that these differences were clinically significant.

Conclusion An educational intervention that supplements clinical practice results in improved knowledge in first-time hearing aid users.

Acknowledgments
This presents independent research funded by National Institute for Health Research Grant PB-PG-0909-20294 under its Research for Patient Benefit program. We thank research team members Holly Thomas, James Henderson, and Michael Taylor; the audiologists at Nottingham Audiology Service who recruited the participants; and our patient and public involvement panel.
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