The Effect of Advancing Age on Auditory Middle- and Long-Latency Evoked Potentials Using a Steady-State-Response Approach Purpose The purpose of the study was to objectively detect age-specific changes that occur in equivalent auditory steady-state responses (ASSRs), corresponding to transient middle- and long-latency auditory evoked potentials as a function of repetition rate and advancing age. Method The study included 48 healthy hearing adults who were ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 2015
The Effect of Advancing Age on Auditory Middle- and Long-Latency Evoked Potentials Using a Steady-State-Response Approach
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Abreena I. Tlumak
    Veterans Administration Pittsburgh Healthcare System, Pennsylvania
  • John D. Durrant
    University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
  • Rafael E. Delgado
    Intelligent Hearing Systems, Miami, Florida
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to John D. Durrant: durrant@pitt.edu
  • Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes
    Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Older Adults & Aging / Speech, Voice & Prosody / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 2015
The Effect of Advancing Age on Auditory Middle- and Long-Latency Evoked Potentials Using a Steady-State-Response Approach
American Journal of Audiology, December 2015, Vol. 24, 494-507. doi:10.1044/2015_AJA-15-0036
History: Received June 21, 2015 , Revised July 31, 2015 , Accepted August 14, 2015
 
American Journal of Audiology, December 2015, Vol. 24, 494-507. doi:10.1044/2015_AJA-15-0036
History: Received June 21, 2015; Revised July 31, 2015; Accepted August 14, 2015
Web of Science® Times Cited: 3

Purpose The purpose of the study was to objectively detect age-specific changes that occur in equivalent auditory steady-state responses (ASSRs), corresponding to transient middle- and long-latency auditory evoked potentials as a function of repetition rate and advancing age.

Method The study included 48 healthy hearing adults who were equally divided into 3 groups by age: 20–39, 40–59, and 60–79 years. ASSRs were recorded at 7 repetition rates from 40 down to 0.75 Hz, elicited by trains of repeated tone burst stimuli.

Results Temporal analysis of middle- and long-latency equivalent ASSRs revealed no appreciable changes in the magnitudes of the response across the age groups. Likewise, the spectral analysis revealed that advancing age did not substantially affect the spectral content of the response at each repetition rate. Furthermore, the harmonic sum was not significantly different across the 3 age groups, between the younger adults versus the combined Older Group Sample 1 and Sample 2, and between the two extreme age groups (i.e., 20–39 vs. 60–79) for the middle- and long-latency equivalent ASSRs.

Conclusion Advancing age has no effect on the long-latency equivalent ASSRs; however, aging does affect the middle-latency equivalent ASSRs when the mean age difference is ≥ 40 years.

Acknowledgments
The authors are grateful for support from the Office of Research and Development Service, Department of Veterans Affairs (Project IDC7620-M, Career Development Award [CDA] to the first author), as well as the Geriatric Research Education and Clinical Center, a merit grant to Sheila Pratt (host laboratory director and CDA co-mentor), and Patrick Doyle, Director of Audiology and Speech Pathology Services. Special thanks are given to Elaine Rubinstein for her assistance in statistical analysis. The contents do not represent the views of the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs or the U.S. government.
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