Influence of Test Condition on Speech Perception With Electric-Acoustic Stimulation Purpose The goal of this work was to better understand speech perception for cochlear implant (CI) users with bilateral residual hearing, including consideration of effects related to listening conditions and test measures. Of interest was the role of acoustic hearing for speech perception in a complex background, the role of ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 2015
Influence of Test Condition on Speech Perception With Electric-Acoustic Stimulation
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Margaret T. Dillon
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Emily Buss
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Oliver F. Adunka
    The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, Columbus
  • Craig A. Buchman
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Harold C. Pillsbury
    University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • Disclosure: This work was supported by a research grant from MED-EL Corporation. Drs. Pillsbury and Buchman serve on the MED-EL surgical advisory board.
    Disclosure: This work was supported by a research grant from MED-EL Corporation. Drs. Pillsbury and Buchman serve on the MED-EL surgical advisory board.×
  • Correspondence to Margaret T. Dillon: mdillon@med.unc.edu
  • Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes
    Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Acoustics / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 2015
Influence of Test Condition on Speech Perception With Electric-Acoustic Stimulation
American Journal of Audiology, December 2015, Vol. 24, 520-528. doi:10.1044/2015_AJA-15-0022
History: Received April 6, 2015 , Revised August 25, 2015 , Accepted September 5, 2015
 
American Journal of Audiology, December 2015, Vol. 24, 520-528. doi:10.1044/2015_AJA-15-0022
History: Received April 6, 2015; Revised August 25, 2015; Accepted September 5, 2015
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose The goal of this work was to better understand speech perception for cochlear implant (CI) users with bilateral residual hearing, including consideration of effects related to listening conditions and test measures. Of interest was the role of acoustic hearing for speech perception in a complex background, the role of listening experience for CI-alone conditions, and whether performance with electric-acoustic stimulation (EAS) was improved by a contralateral hearing aid (HA).

Method Eleven subjects provided data on Consonant-Nucleus-Consonant (CNC; Peterson & Lehiste, 1962) words in quiet, City University of New York (CUNY; Boothroyd, Hanin, & Hnath, 1985) sentences in steady noise, and Bamford-Kowal-Bench (Bench, Kowal, & Bamford, 1979) sentences in multitalker babble. Listening conditions included: CI with a full-frequency map, CI with a truncated-frequency map, EAS, and EAS+HA (EAS plus contralateral HA). Sounds were presented at 0° azimuth.

Results For CNC words and CUNY sentences, performance was better with the truncated-frequency than the full-frequency map, and performance with EAS was better than for either CI-alone condition. For Bench-Kowal-Bamford sentences, EAS+HA was better than EAS.

Conclusions As demonstrated previously, performance was better in the EAS condition than either CI-alone condition. Better performance in the truncated-frequency than full-frequency CI-alone condition suggests that listening experience may be important. A contralateral HA improved performance over unilateral EAS under some conditions.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by a research grant from MED-EL Corporation. Drs. Buchman and Pillsbury serve on the MED-EL surgical advisory board.
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