The Relationship Between Hearing Aid Self-Efficacy and Hearing Aid Satisfaction Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between self-efficacy for hearing aids (HAs) and satisfaction with HAs in a group of adult HA owners. Method Forty-seven adults acquiring HAs (new and experienced owners) completed a demographic questionnaire, the Hearing Handicap Questionnaire (Gatehouse & Noble, ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 2015
The Relationship Between Hearing Aid Self-Efficacy and Hearing Aid Satisfaction
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Rebecca J. Kelly-Campbell
    University of Canterbury, Christchurch, New Zealand
  • Anna McMillan
    Bay Audiology, Christchurch, New Zealand
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Rebecca J. Kelly-Campbell: rebecca.kelly@canterbury.ac.nz
  • Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes
    Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 2015
The Relationship Between Hearing Aid Self-Efficacy and Hearing Aid Satisfaction
American Journal of Audiology, December 2015, Vol. 24, 529-535. doi:10.1044/2015_AJA-15-0028
History: Received May 15, 2015 , Revised July 29, 2015 , Accepted September 5, 2015
 
American Journal of Audiology, December 2015, Vol. 24, 529-535. doi:10.1044/2015_AJA-15-0028
History: Received May 15, 2015; Revised July 29, 2015; Accepted September 5, 2015
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose The purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between self-efficacy for hearing aids (HAs) and satisfaction with HAs in a group of adult HA owners.

Method Forty-seven adults acquiring HAs (new and experienced owners) completed a demographic questionnaire, the Hearing Handicap Questionnaire (Gatehouse & Noble, 2004), and received an audiometric evaluation prior to HA fitting. Twelve weeks following the completion of the HA fitting, they completed the Measure of Audiologic Rehabilitation Self-Efficacy for Hearing Aids (Smith & West, 2006) and the Satisfaction with Amplification in Daily Life (Cox & Alexander, 1999) questionnaires.

Results There were no significant differences between experienced and new HA owners in terms of self-efficacy or HA satisfaction. The majority of participants had adequate self-efficacy for basic HA handling and adjustment to HAs. Fewer participants had adequate self-efficacy for aided listening and advanced handling of HAs. HA self-efficacy was related to HA satisfaction in three domains: positive effect and negative features of HAs and service and cost.

Conclusion Many HA owners do not have adequate self-efficacy in important HA-related domains. Clinical intervention to improve self-efficacy for HAs may help improve HA satisfaction.

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