Accelerometer-Determined Physical Activity and Mortality in a National Prospective Cohort Study: Considerations by Hearing Sensitivity Background Previous work demonstrates that hearing impairment and physical inactivity are associated with premature all-cause mortality. The purpose of this study was to discern whether increased physical activity among those with hearing impairment can produce survival benefits. Method Data from the 2003–2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey ... Research Note
Research Note  |   December 01, 2015
Accelerometer-Determined Physical Activity and Mortality in a National Prospective Cohort Study: Considerations by Hearing Sensitivity
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Paul D. Loprinzi
    Center for Behavioral Research, Department of Health, Exercise Science and Recreation Management, The University of Mississippi, Oxford
  • Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Paul D. Loprinzi: pdloprin@olemiss.edu
  • Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes
    Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Research Issues, Methods & Evidence-Based Practice / Research Notes
Research Note   |   December 01, 2015
Accelerometer-Determined Physical Activity and Mortality in a National Prospective Cohort Study: Considerations by Hearing Sensitivity
American Journal of Audiology, December 2015, Vol. 24, 569-572. doi:10.1044/2015_AJA-15-0044
History: Received July 9, 2015 , Revised September 6, 2015 , Accepted September 25, 2015
 
American Journal of Audiology, December 2015, Vol. 24, 569-572. doi:10.1044/2015_AJA-15-0044
History: Received July 9, 2015; Revised September 6, 2015; Accepted September 25, 2015

Background Previous work demonstrates that hearing impairment and physical inactivity are associated with premature all-cause mortality. The purpose of this study was to discern whether increased physical activity among those with hearing impairment can produce survival benefits.

Method Data from the 2003–2006 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey were used, with follow-up through 2011. Physical activity was objectively measured over 7 days via accelerometry. Hearing sensitivity was objectively measured using a modified Hughson Westlake procedure.

Results Among the 1,482 participants, 152 died during the follow-up period (10.26%, unweighted); the unweighted median follow-up period was 89 months (interquartile range = 74–98 months). For those with normal hearing and after adjustments, for every 60-min increase in physical activity, adults had a 19% (HR [Hazard Ratio] = 0.81; 95% confidence interval [CI] [0.48–1.35]; p = .40) reduced risk of all-cause mortality; however, this association was not statistically significant. In a similar manner, physical activity was not associated with all-cause mortality among those with mild hearing loss (HR = 0.76; 95% CI [0.51–1.13]; p = .17). However, after adjustments, and for every 60-min increase in physical activity for those with moderate or greater hearing loss, there was a 20% (HR = 0.20; 95% CI [0.67–0.95]; p = .01) reduced risk of all-cause mortality.

Conclusion Physical activity may help to prolong survival among those with greater hearing impairment.

Acknowledgment
No funding was used to prepare this article, and the author discloses there are no conflicts of interest.
Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Audiology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access