Retrospective Analysis of Decreasing the Use of Anesthesia in Pediatric Audiology: A Preliminary Study Purpose The purpose of this article is to analyze outcomes of processes aimed at reducing the need for use of anesthesia in evaluating pediatric hearing loss. Method A retrospective chart review was completed to assess how often a pediatric hearing evaluation was successful/not successful and auditory brainstem response ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 2015
Retrospective Analysis of Decreasing the Use of Anesthesia in Pediatric Audiology: A Preliminary Study
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Gail Padish-Clarin
    Cardon Children's Medical Center, Mesa, AZ
  • Andrea J. Hawkins
    Cardon Children's Medical Center, Mesa, AZ
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Gail Padish-Clarin: gail.clarin@bannerhealth.com
  • Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes
    Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 2015
Retrospective Analysis of Decreasing the Use of Anesthesia in Pediatric Audiology: A Preliminary Study
American Journal of Audiology, December 2015, Vol. 24, 557-562. doi:10.1044/2015_AJA-15-0043
History: Received July 7, 2015 , Revised September 9, 2015 , Accepted September 25, 2015
 
American Journal of Audiology, December 2015, Vol. 24, 557-562. doi:10.1044/2015_AJA-15-0043
History: Received July 7, 2015; Revised September 9, 2015; Accepted September 25, 2015

Purpose The purpose of this article is to analyze outcomes of processes aimed at reducing the need for use of anesthesia in evaluating pediatric hearing loss.

Method A retrospective chart review was completed to assess how often a pediatric hearing evaluation was successful/not successful and auditory brainstem response (ABR) testing with anesthesia was avoided/required following review of orders for ABR testing with anesthesia.

Results A total of 30% of the patients referred for ABR with anesthesia successfully completed a pediatric hearing evaluation, therefore avoiding anesthesia. Male subjects and subjects with developmental delay were less likely to avoid testing with anesthesia. None of the subjects with a comorbidity of developmental delay completed a pediatric hearing evaluation successfully. Other comorbidities with low success rates were autism spectrum disorder and speech delay. No significant outcome differences were measured as a function of referral source.

Conclusions Processes implemented in this study resulted in elimination of the need to use anesthesia to evaluate hearing in a large portion of patients referred. Success rates for avoiding anesthesia may vary depending on available resources, physician education, and population tested. Additional benefits of the described process include reduced stress on the health care system and families receiving services.

Acknowledgment
The authors wish to thank Rebekah F. Cunningham for contributions to the pilot study leading to this retrospective analysis and to the design of this study.
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