Service Learning in Undergraduate Audiology Education Purpose The purpose of this study was to incorporate a service learning project in an undergraduate audiology course and evaluate how it affected student learning in the class. Method The study involved partnering with a group of students enrolled in a band learning community. Students in the audiology ... Research Article
Research Article  |   December 01, 2015
Service Learning in Undergraduate Audiology Education
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Lata A. Krishnan
    Department of Speech, Language, and Hearing Sciences, Purdue University, West Lafayette, IN
  • K. Andrew R. Richards
    Department of Kinesiology, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa
  • Mary Bajek
    Department of Kinesiology and Physical Education, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Lata A. Krishnan: krishnal@purdue.edu
  • Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes
    Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Professional Issues & Training / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research Articles
Research Article   |   December 01, 2015
Service Learning in Undergraduate Audiology Education
American Journal of Audiology, December 2015, Vol. 24, 508-519. doi:10.1044/2015_AJA-15-0041
History: Received June 29, 2015 , Revised August 11, 2015 , Accepted August 14, 2015
 
American Journal of Audiology, December 2015, Vol. 24, 508-519. doi:10.1044/2015_AJA-15-0041
History: Received June 29, 2015; Revised August 11, 2015; Accepted August 14, 2015

Purpose The purpose of this study was to incorporate a service learning project in an undergraduate audiology course and evaluate how it affected student learning in the class.

Method The study involved partnering with a group of students enrolled in a band learning community. Students in the audiology course learned about hearing assessment procedures in class and practiced the procedures on each other in labs. Toward the end of the semester, they assessed the hearing of the band students and provided counseling regarding the importance of hearing protection. Qualitative data were obtained in the form of preflections and final reflection papers completed by the students in the audiology course at the start and conclusion of the semester. Quantitative data included completion of the Community Service Attitudes Scale (CSAS; Shiarella, McCarthy, & Tucker, 2000) prior to and at the conclusion of the course.

Results Results revealed overwhelmingly positive comments from the students in their final reflections, although there were no significant changes in the pre- and post-administration of the CSAS.

Conclusion Incorporating service learning projects into undergraduate curricula in speech and hearing has the potential to enhance academic and civic learning while also benefitting the community.

Acknowledgments
Thank you to Assistant Professor of Bands Ishbah Cox for collaborating on this project with his Freshman Band Learning Community. Thank you also to Breanne Lawler and Lauren Rosswurm, the teaching assistants for the audiology course, who helped with the organization and implementation of the SL project in the undergraduate audiology course.
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