Chirp-Evoked Auditory Brainstem Response in Children: A Review Purpose The aim of this study was to assess the use of the chirp stimulus to record auditory brainstem responses in the pediatric population via a traditional review. Method An electronic search of the literature and a hand search of the literature were conducted. Studies that utilized chirp ... Review Article
Review Article  |   December 01, 2015
Chirp-Evoked Auditory Brainstem Response in Children: A Review
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Gabriel Anne Bargen
    Idaho State University, Meridian Health Science Center
  • Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The author has declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Gabriel Anne Bargen: barggabr@isu.edu
  • Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes
    Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes×
Article Information
Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Early Identification & Intervention / Review Article
Review Article   |   December 01, 2015
Chirp-Evoked Auditory Brainstem Response in Children: A Review
American Journal of Audiology, December 2015, Vol. 24, 573-583. doi:10.1044/2015_AJA-15-0016
History: Received February 4, 2015 , Revised June 25, 2015 , Accepted June 28, 2015
 
American Journal of Audiology, December 2015, Vol. 24, 573-583. doi:10.1044/2015_AJA-15-0016
History: Received February 4, 2015; Revised June 25, 2015; Accepted June 28, 2015
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose The aim of this study was to assess the use of the chirp stimulus to record auditory brainstem responses in the pediatric population via a traditional review.

Method An electronic search of the literature and a hand search of the literature were conducted. Studies that utilized chirp stimuli within the pediatric population that met all of the inclusion criteria were included in this review. Qualitative synthesis and interpretation of the data were completed.

Results Seven studies that met the inclusion criteria were included in the review. Chirp stimuli produce auditory brainstem response (ABR) waveform amplitudes in children similar to those in adults when presented at moderate to low frequency levels. Latency data from chirp stimuli are not consistent when stimulus presentation rates are altered. Test–retest reliability when using the chirp stimulus was found to be good, as were sensitivity and specificity of chirp-evoked ABRs utilized in a newborn hearing screening protocol.

Conclusion Reviewed studies indicated that when presented at 60 dB nHL or lower, broadband chirp–generated ABRs have larger amplitudes than click-generated ABRs in children with normal hearing. Utilization of chirp stimuli decreases test time because waveforms are easier to detect with increased synchronization. Further research should focus on correlating chirp thresholds with behavioral hearing thresholds. Given the variance of results in these select studies, future research should also evaluate latency findings and focus on developing normative data for infants with hearing impairment and normal hearing.

Order a Subscription
Pay Per View
Entire American Journal of Audiology content & archive
24-hour access
This Article
24-hour access