Reduction in High-Frequency Hearing Aid Gain Can Improve Performance in Patients With Contralateral Cochlear Implant: A Pilot Study Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine whether an alternate fitting strategy, specifically adjustment to gains in a hearing aid (HA), would improve performance in patients who experienced poorer performance in the bimodal condition when the HA was fit to traditional targets. Method This study was ... Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus  |   December 01, 2015
Reduction in High-Frequency Hearing Aid Gain Can Improve Performance in Patients With Contralateral Cochlear Implant: A Pilot Study
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Jessica J. Messersmith
    University of South Dakota, Vermillion
  • Lindsey E. Jorgensen
    University of South Dakota, Vermillion
  • Jessica A. Hagg
    University of South Dakota, Vermillion
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Jessica Messersmith: Jessica.Messersmith@usd.edu
  • Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes
    Editor and Associate Editor: Larry Humes×
Article Information
Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Clinical Focus
Clinical Focus   |   December 01, 2015
Reduction in High-Frequency Hearing Aid Gain Can Improve Performance in Patients With Contralateral Cochlear Implant: A Pilot Study
American Journal of Audiology, December 2015, Vol. 24, 462-468. doi:10.1044/2015_AJA-15-0045
History: Received July 15, 2015 , Revised October 6, 2015 , Accepted October 19, 2015
 
American Journal of Audiology, December 2015, Vol. 24, 462-468. doi:10.1044/2015_AJA-15-0045
History: Received July 15, 2015; Revised October 6, 2015; Accepted October 19, 2015

Purpose The purpose of this study was to determine whether an alternate fitting strategy, specifically adjustment to gains in a hearing aid (HA), would improve performance in patients who experienced poorer performance in the bimodal condition when the HA was fit to traditional targets.

Method This study was a retrospective chart review from a local clinic population seen during a 6-month period. Participants included 6 users of bimodal stimulation. Two performed poorer in the cochlear implant (CI) + HA condition than in the CI-only condition. One individual performed higher in the bimodal condition, but the overall performance was low. Three age range–matched users whose performance increased when the HA was used in conjunction with a CI were also included. The HA gain was reduced beyond 2000 Hz. Speech perception scores were obtained pre- and postmodification to the HA fitting.

Results All listeners whose HA was programmed using the modified approach demonstrated improved speech perception scores with the modified HA fit in the bimodal condition when compared with the traditional HA fit in the bimodal condition.

Conclusion Modifications to gains above 2000 Hz in the HA may improve performance for bimodal listeners who perform more poorly in the bimodal condition when the HA is fit to traditional targets.

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