Use of Baby Isao Simulator and Standardized Parents in Hearing Screening and Parent Counseling Education Purpose The primary purpose of this study was to test the effect of the combined use of trained standardized parents and a baby simulator on students' hearing screening and parental counseling knowledge and skills. Method A one-group pretest-posttest quasi-experimental study design was used to assess self-ratings of confidence ... Research Article
Research Article  |   September 01, 2016
Use of Baby Isao Simulator and Standardized Parents in Hearing Screening and Parent Counseling Education
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Ahmad A. Alanazi
    University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock
    University of Arkansas at Little Rock
    King Saud bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences, Riyadh, Saudi Arabia
  • Nannette Nicholson
    University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock
    University of Arkansas at Little Rock
  • Samuel R. Atcherson
    University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock
    University of Arkansas at Little Rock
  • Clifford Franklin
    University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock
    University of Arkansas at Little Rock
  • Michael Anders
    University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock
  • Naveen Nagaraj
    University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock
    University of Arkansas at Little Rock
  • Jennifer Franklin
    University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock
    University of Arkansas at Little Rock
  • Patricia Highley
    University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences, Little Rock
    University of Arkansas at Little Rock
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Ahmad A. Alanazi: aalanazi@uams.edu
  • Editor: Sumitrajit Dhar
    Editor: Sumitrajit Dhar×
  • Associate Editor: Ryan McCreery
    Associate Editor: Ryan McCreery×
Article Information
Development / Hearing Disorders / Special Populations / Early Identification & Intervention / Attention, Memory & Executive Functions / Research Articles
Research Article   |   September 01, 2016
Use of Baby Isao Simulator and Standardized Parents in Hearing Screening and Parent Counseling Education
American Journal of Audiology, September 2016, Vol. 25, 211-223. doi:10.1044/2016_AJA-16-0029
History: Received February 28, 2016 , Revised April 10, 2016 , Accepted May 20, 2016
 
American Journal of Audiology, September 2016, Vol. 25, 211-223. doi:10.1044/2016_AJA-16-0029
History: Received February 28, 2016; Revised April 10, 2016; Accepted May 20, 2016
Web of Science® Times Cited: 1

Purpose The primary purpose of this study was to test the effect of the combined use of trained standardized parents and a baby simulator on students' hearing screening and parental counseling knowledge and skills.

Method A one-group pretest-posttest quasi-experimental study design was used to assess self-ratings of confidence in knowledge and skills and satisfaction of the educational experience with standardized parents and a baby simulator. The mean age of the 14 audiology students participating in this study was 24.79 years (SD = 1.58). Participants completed a pre- and postevent questionnaire in which they rated their level of confidence for specific knowledge and skills. Six students (2 students in each scenario) volunteered to participate in the infant hearing screening and counseling scenarios, whereas others participated as observers. All participants participated in the briefing and debriefing sessions immediately before and after each of 3 scenarios. After the last scenario, participants were asked to complete a satisfaction survey of their learning experience using simulation and standardized parents.

Results Overall, the pre- and post–simulation event questionnaire revealed a significant improvement in the participants' self-rated confidence levels regarding knowledge and skills. The mean difference between pre- and postevent scores was 0.52 (p < .01). The mean satisfaction level was 4.71 (range = 3.91–5.00; SD = 0.30) based on a Likert scale, where 1 = not satisfied and 5 = very satisfied.

Conclusions The results of this novel educational activity demonstrate the value of using infant hearing screening and parental counseling simulation sessions to enhance student learning. In addition, this study demonstrates the use of simulation and standardized parents as an important pedagogical tool for audiology students. Students experienced a high level of satisfaction with the learning experience.

Acknowledgments
We thank Sherry Johnson for her time and cooperation and the standardized patients who were dedicated to the education of these students. This study was funded in part by the Dean's Society Education Enhancement Grant, College of Health Professions, UAMS, 2015.
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