Identifying and Prioritizing Diseases Important for Detection in Adult Hearing Health Care Purpose The purpose of this research note is to identify and prioritize diseases important for detection in adult hearing health care delivery systems. Method Through literature review and expert consultation, the authors identified 195 diseases likely to occur in adults complaining of hearing loss. Five neurotologists rated the ... Research Note
Research Note  |   September 01, 2016
Identifying and Prioritizing Diseases Important for Detection in Adult Hearing Health Care
 
Author Affiliations & Notes
  • Samantha J. Kleindienst
    Mayo Clinic, Scottsdale, AZ
  • Sumitrajit Dhar
    The Roxelyn & Richard Pepper Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
    The Hugh Knowles Center, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
  • Donald W. Nielsen
    The Roxelyn & Richard Pepper Department of Communication Sciences and Disorders, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
    The Hugh Knowles Center, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
  • James W. Griffith
    Department of Medical Social Sciences, Northwestern University, Evanston, IL
  • Larry B. Lundy
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL
  • Colin Driscoll
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
  • Brian Neff
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
  • Charles Beatty
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Mayo Clinic, Rochester, MN
  • David Barrs
    Department of Otolaryngology, Mayo Clinic, Phoenix, AZ
  • David A. Zapala
    Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Mayo Clinic, Jacksonville, FL
  • Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication.
    Disclosure: The authors have declared that no competing interests existed at the time of publication. ×
  • Correspondence to Samantha J. Kleindienst: kleindienst.samantha@mayo.edu
  • Editor: Nancy Tye-Murray
    Editor: Nancy Tye-Murray×
  • Associate Editor: Ann Eddins
    Associate Editor: Ann Eddins×
Article Information
Hearing & Speech Perception / Hearing Disorders / Hearing Aids, Cochlear Implants & Assistive Technology / Research Note
Research Note   |   September 01, 2016
Identifying and Prioritizing Diseases Important for Detection in Adult Hearing Health Care
American Journal of Audiology, September 2016, Vol. 25, 224-231. doi:10.1044/2016_AJA-15-0079
History: Received December 7, 2015 , Revised April 7, 2016 , Accepted May 20, 2016
 
American Journal of Audiology, September 2016, Vol. 25, 224-231. doi:10.1044/2016_AJA-15-0079
History: Received December 7, 2015; Revised April 7, 2016; Accepted May 20, 2016

Purpose The purpose of this research note is to identify and prioritize diseases important for detection in adult hearing health care delivery systems.

Method Through literature review and expert consultation, the authors identified 195 diseases likely to occur in adults complaining of hearing loss. Five neurotologists rated the importance of disease on 3 dimensions related to the necessity of detection prior to adult hearing aid fitting.

Results Ratings of adverse health consequences, diagnostic difficulty, and presence of nonotologic symptoms associated with these diseases resulted in the identification of 104 diseases potentially important for detection prior to adult hearing aid fitting.

Conclusions Current and evolving health care delivery systems, including direct-to-consumer sales, involve inconsistent means of disease detection vigilance prior to device fitting. The first steps in determining the safety of these different delivery methods are to identify and prioritize which diseases present the greatest risk for poor health outcomes and, thus, should be detected in hearing health care delivery systems. Here the authors have developed a novel multidimensional rating system to rank disease importance. The rankings can be used to evaluate the effectiveness of alternative detection methods and to inform public health policy. The authors are currently using this information to validate a consumer questionnaire designed to accurately identify when pre- fitting medical evaluations should be required for hearing aid patients.

Acknowledgments
This work was supported by grants from the National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders (Grant R21 DC013115-02, awarded to Sumitrajit Dhar and David A. Zapala), the Knowles Hearing Center at Northwestern University (awarded to Sumitrajit Dhar, Donald W. Nielsen, and David A. Zapala), and by the James Russell and Martha Crawford Endowed Clinical Research Fellowship in Otolaryngology (awarded to Samantha J. Kleindienst). We thank Rachael Baiduc and Chun Chan for assistance with data collection and analysis and Greta Stamper and Dania Rishiq for their assistance in manuscript preparation. Conflicts of interest and source of funding: All authors declare there is no conflict of interest. Portions of this study were presented at the annual meeting of the American Auditory Society (2015).
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